Oh, Just Forget It


The mind is an amazing thing. Having dealt with the effects of epilepsy all of my life, the gringa finds the subject of memory particularly fascinating. Amnesia is a typical side effect of intense seizure activity. Not only have I experienced amnesia, but often I will have some limited recall which is like taking a memory and making  a meal of scrambled eggs. I get it all wrong.  Having a blank space of time may sound frightening but I have learned to live with it. I simply have to shrug and move on. It even comes in handy from time to time if I have behaved particularly bad because I can then always say, “Really? I had no idea. I’m terribly sorry. I was simply not myself at the time.” I’m not sure the caveman is buying that line after all these years but, at the very least, he usually goes along with it.

So, the gringa has experienced the effect of seizure related amnesia as a cause for my creating false memories. Fortunately the caveman is understanding and does not believe that his little wife is a big, fat liar but just sick and confused. I am happy to know that I am not alone. In fact, none of us are. According to research by Shari R. Berkowitz and Jennifer Sumner, both assistant professors at California State University, all humans create false memories. Their studies revealed that it is actually very easy to implant false memories through different suggestive methods:

  • People were given a list of words that had something in common: pillow, sheets, bed, nap. The common link, sleep, was not on the list. Once the list was removed, the word sleep was suggested as being on the list and subjects agreed that they remembered seeing the word sleep on the list.
  • Participants had a dream interpreted. Days later it was suggested that the events of the dream were a real occurrence. The dreamer would recall the event as something that actually happened.
  • Study participants listed 4 interesting events like football games, political speeches, etc. and then read corresponding news stories related to the events. Of the news stories offered, one was bogus yet the participants invariably remembered the event occurring. Having a strong interest in a particular subject actually increased the chances of creating a false memory. Consequently, because the person considers themselves well-versed in the subject, they are also less likely to accept they are believing a false memory.
  • Rich memory events are false memories of something fantastic happening like being possessed or kidnapped.

Now, for the gringa, this rich memory theory is of particular interest. When I was a little girl the earliest memory, or, at least, what I thought was a memory, was of being a toddler and playing on the back porch of our home with our cat. I distinctly remember a group of Native Americans crossing the creek beside our home, entering our backyard and shooting me with an arrow.

As a child I was convinced this was a real memory. It was not until I was a teenager that I would recall this “memory” and realize I was wrong. But what made me believe such a thing? And why did I have no fear or animosity toward Native Americans? In fact, it was quite the opposite. I was fascinated with their history and fantasized of a romantic alternative life as part of a tribe. This would seem contrary to the typical psychology that would have resulted from a trauma. So what the heck happened to the gringa?

I blame my father. He was always making up fantastic stories to drive my sisters and I crazy. For example, I was very freckled as a youngster. He told me they were bird spots. That, because I liked to play outside all the time as a little girl, I was always getting pooped on by birds and those were the stains left behind. He even had a favorite bird species to mention in this explanation of freckles, buzzards. Not very nice, I know, but in my Daddy’s warped mind he thought he was simply hysterical and clever.

So, as for getting shot with an arrow, the gringa’s dear readers must understand that my Daddy grew up in an era of zero political correctness many years before the passage of the Civil Rights Act. He grew up in an America where white supremacy was the law of the land. So, he thought nothing of it when accusing Native Americans of shooting his little girl to explain why I had a navel. As a lover of old western movies, of course he would tell such a tale. That fantastic story had such an impact on my young, impressionable mind, I actually believed that I had a memory of a Native American Indian tribe raiding the back yard of my family home during the era of the Vietnam War.

And that, my dear readers, is why such research is so very important. Not just to get history correct, but to recognize that eye-witness testimony in criminal cases is often very flawed. Often times young people who undergo therapy to re-capture memories are not remembering actual events. This could result in ruining the lives of not only the falsely accused but by creating a victim who is actually not a victim.  If we can rely on anything when it comes to memory, it is that it is simply not reliable.

Consider that the gringa can remember the telephone number of her childhood home and several childhood friends yet I cannot remember the caveman’s telephone number at work. I can list the titles of the first three novels I read from cover to cover as a little girl but I can’t remember to buy dog food if I leave my shopping list at home. I can recall the words to a song I have never performed and haven’t heard on the radio in over ten years but I can’t keep the birthdates of my children straight. What is up with that? Science says it is because there are different types of memory and they each have their own special mechanism that causes forgetting.

Doorway Memory

If you find that you walk from one room to another, forgetting why you made the trip, this is the problem of doorway memory. Walking through a doorway into another physical setting is like hitting a reset button in your memory bank.

Flashbulb Memory

Emotionally vivid events often cause people to create flashbulb memories. These accounts become so vivid that they believe they will never forget, like remembering where you were when you heard the news of 9/11 or that John F. Kennedy had been assassinated. The gringa must inform you that although one would think these memories would be etched forever upon our minds, it simply ain’t so.  Although we will never forget that those events happened, we will, indeed, eventually forget where we were when we got the news. We may recall with effort where we were, but it won’t actually be a memory of the place and conditions surrounding us. It will be the remembrance of a fact we know to be historically true. Unless, of course, we were one of the victims. But traumatic memory is also tricky.

Traumatic Memory

If you were a victim of 9/11, or any other trauma, one of two things might happen with your memory. You will never forget anything, not even the smells or particular sounds. The other option is that you could forget absolutely everything, complete amnesia. If a trauma is so extreme that the brain determines that the person cannot emotionally bear the pain, the brain disposes of the memory with a deep burial process. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may very well be the result with certain events, words, colors, smells, sounds, etc. triggering an anxiety attack of dangerous and epic proportions where the person begins to relive the experience of the trauma.

Mind Erase

Certain activities can cause what is termed “transient global amnesia”.  This doesn’t mean that world travelers forget stuff. No, the gringa breaks it down like this: Transient (temporary) global (affecting a particular part of the brain) amnesia (forgetting). There is no telling who may be affected by this condition or why it happens. Basically, a person can have experience a temporary amnesia event, forgetting the entire previous day for a few hours after certain types of activity like: sex, migraines, mild head trauma, exposure to sudden temperature extremes.

Life After Access

It is not uncommon to have a memory recall event of something you believe never even happened. Something may happen to trigger the memory and suddenly a person remembers something that they didn’t even know that they knew. This can be disturbing and cause some people to believe they have been reincarnated as another person. Consider the case of a woman who suddenly remembered the words to songs she had no memory of learning. No, she was not an opera singer in a previous life. Neurologists explained that at some point in early childhood, before her brain was capable of remembering events (typically before the age of 4), she was exposed to the music and it imprinted on her mind. Later in life, something related to that event triggered the memory of the music.

Brain Injuries & Insults

This cause the gringa knows only too well. Most people think a brain injury is when a person hits their head and injures their brain. Actually, that could also be a brain insult. You see, an insult to the brain is not forgetting things because someone called you stupid. It is an injury that is so traumatic that brain matter is physically displaced.

A physical blow to the head is also not the only thing that can cause a brain to receive an insult. Certain diseases can cause swelling of the brain or fluid to fill the sinus cavities of the brain. Both events can cause physical displacement of brain matter, thus an insult to the brain.

Whereas the electrical storm of a seizure is a brain injury, it does not physically rearrange the structure of the brain like a catastrophic blow to the head. However, both injuries and insults will affect memory. And there can be seizures that have the potential to do just as much brain damage as a traumatic brain insult.

What’s The Point

So, then, what’s the point of knowing that memory cannot be relied upon? For the gringa, I have learned the importance of journaling. Not just to be able to remember the personal details of my life, but it has proven critical in managing important aspects of life, such as getting an insurance claim processed. The most common method of journaling performed today, and most people may not even realize that is what they are doing, is posting status updates to Facebook. The average American probably takes their memory for granted. Not the gringa. I post status updates frequently as well as keep an actual, personal journal.

In matters of law, it is entirely possible that there are people sitting in jail for crimes they did not commit because of flawed eye witness testimony. This is simply a travesty now that we understand the human mind better. Wherever possible, physical evidence should always supersede eyewitness accounts.

As for those poor souls that believe they have been abducted by aliens, the gringa can only point to her navel  and offer  a facial expression of raised eyebrows. Really? Abducted by aliens? If I could believe I had actually been shot by an arrow, a victim of a Native American raid in a small town in Texas in the 1970’s, I can assure alien abductees that they, too, have been duped by their memories. Chances are they had a Daddy like mine who enjoyed titillating their imagination with fantastical stories. Like me, their impressionable minds were imprinted with a fantasy story delivered by someone they absolutely trusted as faithful and true, so, in childlike innocence they never questioned the veracity of the story and grew up believing it to be true. Alien abductee? No. Victim of a fantastic storyteller? Most likely.

Sources:

www.livescience.com

www.csudhnews.com

www.mayoclinic.org

www.neuroskills.com

www.livescience.com

Image Credit: lymeinside.files.wordpress.com

 

Advertisements

Let It Rain, Let It Rain, Let It Rain


Although Olympic focus has been trained on Rio, the gringa would like to take the dear reader back in time and to the other side of the globe to the 2008 Beijing Olympics. When China was preparing to host this historical event, pollution was high on the list of problems to solve. Although everyone is probably familiar with the tactic of temporary bans on driving & factory operations as drastic measures to help reduce smog. What many may not be aware of is China’s ambitious plans to control the weather, a $30 million dollar plan that they are still working on today. A plan to shoot into the heavens special “bullets” filled with salt and other minerals. What in the world are those crazy Chinese scientists up to? Apparently, nothing new! They’re just trying to make it rain.

Officially called “weather modification”, China helped clear their smog-filled skies during the Olympic games by making it rain, rain, rain. They are not alone in being rainmakers. Fifty-two other countries have developed their own rainmaking strategies. Ten of these countries joining the rainmaking team only five years ago. Rainmaking countries include: Canada, United States, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Australia, India, Senegal, South Africa, Russia and the list goes on. You can see the map created by the World Meteorological Organization to see who all is in on the rainmaking game.

The gringa is rather ashamed to admit that as for the United States, the origins of its weather modification program is not as noble as China’s. For the U.S., it all started with Operation Popeye which was a top secret program that weaponized weather during the Vietnam War. Although I’m sure the scientists who worked for General Electric had noble intentions, they probably had no idea that the U.S. government was going to take their technology and rain down silver iodide on the poor Vietnamese people.

But I digress. Back to China. In addition to creating rain to saturate polluted air and get rid of smog, they also wanted to prevent rain from spoiling events taking place in the stadium that was dubbed the “Bird’s Nest”. To achieve this amazing god-like feat, the Chinese implemented a 3 stage weather modification strategy:

  1. Officials tracked weather patterns with satellites, planes, radar and supercomputer.
  2. 2 aircraft, 20 rocket launcher & artillery sites sprayed silver iodide and dry ice into remote cloud systems that might approach the stadium so they would dump their rain before arrival.
  3. Nearby cloud systems filled with rain were seeded with chemicals that shrink the water droplets thus ensuring that the clouds would have time to pass over the Bird’s Nest without dropping their rain.

Now was all of this really necessary? The Beijing Olympics were held in August which is a high precipitation season for China so, yes, the gringa supposes that it was necessary. Consequently, China’s success in being a master rainmaker or rainstaller has resulted in China being the world leader in the weather modification sciences. They have more than 1,500 professionals devoted to all things necessary in controlling the weather: scientists, pilots, flight crews. Also proudly serving in the program are tens of thousands of peasant farmers who are more than happy to help their government blast away a cloud when crops have been inundated or have clouds seeded during times of drought. Peasants are on call to operate more than 7,000 aircraft guns and almost 5,000 rocket launchers when called to report to rainmaking duty.

The gringa is not too sure what to make of all this. For the most part I am the type to believe that the less we interfere with nature, the better. However, considering how bad mankind has screwed things up where climate change is concerned, it may just be that Mother Nature could use a few rainmakers. So, I say to the Chinese:

Let it rain. Let it rain. Let it rain.

 

Sources:

www.technologyreview.com

www.wmo.int

uspto.gov

fas.org

wikipedia.org/OperationPopeye

Image Credit:  cloudfront.net

 

 

Operation Highjump – Not The Launch of a Dark Ops Space Program


Certain conspiracy theorists (CTs) have put forth that there is a dark ops space program called Dark Fleet that is an offshoot of technology and goals that originated with secret societies that organized during the heyday of Nazi Germany. The members of these organizations were not so much devoted Nazis but, rather, exploited the resources and power of the Nazi party in order to realize their fantastical dream of reuniting with a superpower, extra-terrestrial, master race.

After the Nazi empire crumbled when they lost World War II, many of the members of the secret societies relocated to other countries and kept their dreams and research alive, supposedly developing advanced weapons and spacecraft technology. As proof, CTs offer up the records of Admiral Byrd’s expeditions to the North and South Poles. The gringa says, “Well, let’s take a look at those records.”

There is a wealth of information about Admiral Byrd but the gringa wants to stick with facts and eyewitness accounts. To begin with, a look at official military records. Is there anything interesting there? Hmmm. Let us see…

From 1946-1947 the U.S. Navy had Operation Highjump underway. This operation was overseen by the U.S. Navy Antarctic Developments Program. Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, Jr. was Officer in Charge, leading Task Force 68, and Rear Admiral Richard H. Cruzen was commanding officer. When these two admirals put to sea, they were joined by 4,700 seamen and airmen, 13 military ships, and 33 military aircraft. To achieve the goal of establishing a research base, Little America IV, it sounds like an awful lot of firepower was put into play, but, that’s just the gringa’s curious little mind in overdrive. It could have been perfectly normal to pack all that weaponry on an Antarctic excursion.

The published objectives of the mission were:

  • Personnel training and equipment testing in subzero temperatures
  • Evaluate how to establish, maintain and utilize Antarctic military bases and scout sites
  • Develop techniques for creating, maintaining and using military bases in ice
  • Make new discoveries of the following Antarctic conditions: electromagnetics, geological, geographic, hydrographic, and meteorological

Up until this time it was primarily the British who had spent time exploring Antarctica with eleven expeditions from 1898-1945. Other countries who had explored the earth’s South Pole region: France (2 missions); Germany (3) missions; Belgium, Japan, Norway, and Sweden (all a single mission). Operation High Jump was the second U.S. mission, following the conclusion of Byrd’s initial exploratory expedition four years earlier.

The fleet of ships arrived in the Antarctic December 12, 1946 and immediately set up weather monitoring stations. Within 12 days of arrival aircraft was in the air flying reconnaissance missions. Some of the ships that were in the flotilla:

  • Henderson – Destroyer class, commissioned in 1945 and served with distinction for 35 years receiving (8) battle stars for service in the Korean War and (7) battle stars and a commendation for service in the Vietnam War; armament at the time of Operation Highjump: (6) 5” guns, (12) 40mm anti-aircraft (AA) guns; (11) 20mm AA guns; (10) 21” torpedo tubes
  • Cacapon – Cimarron class fleet oiler; commissioned 1943, decommissioned 1973 and scrapped; armament: (1) 5” gun; (4) 3” guns; (4) twin 40mm AA guns; (4) twin 20mm AA guns
  • Currituck – Currituck class seaplane tender, nicknamed “Wild Goose”; commissioned June 1944, decommissioned October 31 1967, scrapped 1971; armament: (4) 5” guns

Eighteen days after arrival (3) men were killed when their plane crashed during a blizzard. Six crewmen survived the crash and were rescued two weeks later. The remains of the plane and the three lost airmen have never been recovered. The aircraft they were flying was a Martin PBM Mariner. This craft is a patrol bomber flying boat. Standard armament for the Mariners were: (8) 50” machine guns, 2 tons of bombs or depth charges or (2) Mark 13 torpedoes. The gringa can only ask why a bomber would be needed in an exploratory, scientific expedition in Antarctica?

An interesting thing to note is that there was a Navy chaplain serving on the mission. He held a religious service and consecrated Antarctica. The gringa scratches her head and wonders if this is typical or strange? I’m no Catholic so I wouldn’t know.

New Year’s Day, 1947, American dive team began exploring underneath Antarctic ice shelves. The gringa supposes this may have been related to search efforts to locate the downed bomber. No big mystery there.

Two weeks later an airfield was constructed and named “Little America IV”. Within a month, late February, weather conditions worsened and the expedition was terminated. The return trip home would have the expedition making a stop in March along the South American coast. Admiral Byrd gave interviews and a Chilean newspaper, El Mercurio, reported. The most interesting quote the gringa will share is often cited by CTs to prove that something dark was afoot underneath the ice:

“… Byrd warned today that the United States should adopt measures of protection against the possibility of an invasion of the country by hostile planes coming from the polar regions.”

Now, was Byrd’s warning because he thought something sinister was going on secretly at either the North or South Pole? No. That’s not what his warning was about. CTs take that important quote out of context. They don’t usually reveal the rest of the interview which explains Byrd’s reasoning.

He recognized that technology meant the world was shrinking. America was no longer safe from enemy invasion because of isolation and distance. It was well within the capabilities of other nations to fly from one side of the globe, passing over either pole, and reach the U.S. Byrd was not fearful of a threat from an extra-terrestrial master race living within the earth and Antarctica being its headquarters.

So why all the firepower on an exploratory mission? It was right after World War II. The U.S. had already experienced the surprise air assault of Pearl Harbor. The militaries of the Allied Powers knew that Germany had been developing new weapons and technologies. The Navy had no idea what to expect and was taking no chances. The gringa says, “I don’t blame them.” So, no big suspicious, nefarious plot behind packing all the big guns on an expedition to Antarctica.

Just a few of the vessels that comprised the fleet’s complement:

  • Sikorsky R-4 helicopter
  • (2) Coastguard icebreakers
  • US Navy icebreaker
  • (2) Seaplane Tenders
  • (2) Destroyers
  • (2) Tankers
  • Battleship
  • (2) Supply ships
  • Submarine
  • Aircraft carrier (Byrd’s ship)

The gringa thinks that the main reason behind U.S. interest in Antarctica at that time is the same ol’, same ol’ imperialistic territory seeking mentality that has motivated the country’s interest throughout history. Great Britain had spent a lot of time in Antarctica. They also created all sorts of problems over the Falkland Islands. When the U.S. decided to stick their big nose in and establish a military base in Antarctica most of Latin America was none too happy about it.

The Cold War was getting under way and Russia was perfectly suited to wage war in the bitter conditions of a European winter. Americans? Not so much. So, according to official records the expedition to Antarctica was absolutely about military strategy. Not about little green men living under the ice. But, then, there’s Admiral Byrd’s personal diaries. What do they say? Well, come back and see what the gringa finds out!

Sources: Wikipedia and http://www.navy.mil

Photo credit: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz

 

 

Improving The World Has Gone Glam… GEOGlam That Is


Food security in the world is critical to the security of the world in general. When populations become vulnerable due to famine and food shortages, terrible things can happen. Things like wars, massive migrations, malnutrition related disease epidemics, etc. With climate change posing a real threat to the future of food security worldwide, what the heck is being done about this problem?

The international community has come together to go “glam”. No, there is nothing glamorous about hunger. Rather, a group of government leaders, as well as NGO leaders, have formed and call themselves the Group on Earth Observation’s Global Agricultural Monitoring, or, to avoid saying that mouthful, GEOGLAM. They plan to take full advantage of Earth images provided by NASA’s satellites, along with data provided by the space agencies of other nations, to monitor weather and how it will affect the security of crops.

Satellites are not the only hi-tech hardware being put to use. While out in the field, GEOGLAM workers collect data on smartphones and relay it via the internet to GEOGLAM partners. This makes data collection much more efficient and stream lined. No more need to do all that pesky paperwork. The gringa likes that. The gringa likes even better the name for this mobile system of data collection, “MAGIS”. The gringa looks at her smartphone, smiles, and says, “It’s MAGIS!”

Rice is first on the list of crops GEOGLAM monitors. It is the staple grain for not only the largest portion of Earth’s population, but also it’s most vulnerable populations. And it is no easy grain to cultivate. Flood or drought could cause a worldwide starvation catastrophe. Other key crops being monitored are wheat, corn (maize), cotton and sugarcane.

Orbiting satellites provide thermal images of crops that enable GEOGLAM agricultural experts to determine if crop stress is occurring. These hi-tech images can relay such details as moisture and temperature levels of the surface of the land the crop is planted in. This can help create models to protect the viability of critical crops.

Images also provide data that help scientists predict weather patterns. This enables measures to be taken to protect crops in the event of the approach of severe weather. Although it is fine to love your local weatherman who reminds you to take an umbrella with you to work, GEOGLAM’s weathermen are the weathermen that are helping to save the world. The gringa holds them high upon the meteorological pedestal.

GEOGLAM’s eyes in the skies have begun their rice monitoring projects in the nations of Pakistan, Indonesia, Vietnam and Java. In the U.S., Arkansas, and agricultural areas such as Sacramento Valley in California, are also being watched because their water resources are rapidly being depleted. Data processed by GEOGLAM is used to create growing season plans as well as help farmers in these areas manage their local resources, primarily the precious resource of water that is used to irrigate the crops.

A visit to GEOGLAM’s website puts a smile on the gringa’s face. There’s nothing the gringa likes more than solutions. The gringa’s a fixer, a problem-solver, a get ‘er done kind of gal. It’s okay to complain but then you’ve got to get off your bum and FIX IT!

GEOGLAM officially launched in Paris, 2011, with the participation of 20 Agricultural Ministers from the world community. This group is setting out to monitor regions that “… are responsible for over 80% of global crop production…”. As data is gathered regarding these areas, GEOGLAM uses proven scientific methods to analyze weather and other evidence to create consensus based models that work toward the most favorable outcome of crop production and yield.

Although many countries have their own agricultural monitoring systems, GEOGLAM aims to lead the way into the global era. This is the future. Nations no longer live as islands but, rather, as part of a world community. Data is shared. Technologies are shared. Standardized methods are being implemented. It is the recognition that one nation’s food security is the concern of every other nation. The gringa loves this philosophy.

Never before has the world needed scientists and agricultural experts like it does today. These are the fields philanthropic, young students should be encouraged to pursue. If your child wants to change the world, encourage them to be a farmer or meteorologist!

 

Sources: www.nasa.gov and  www.geoglam-crop-monitor.org

Photo credit:  www.en.wikipedia.org

 

 

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part VIII, T-Z


In conclusion of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, this completes the listing of the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

06-APR-70   TAKAGI YUJIRO   CIV   Not on Official DIA list

02-Aug-69   TALKEN GEORGE FRANCIS   USN

19-Jun-64   TALLEY JAMES L.   ARMY   MIA in ground fight on patrol

23-Mar-66   TAPP JOHN B.   USN

10-Sep-66   TATUM LAWRENCE B.   USAF

18-May-65   TAVARES JOHN R.   CIV   Last seen at bar in Da Nang

28-Sep-66   TAYLOR DANNY G.   ARMY

08-May-72   TAYLOR EDMUND B. JR.   USN

13-Jul-65   TAYLOR FRED   ARMY   ARVN Air/Ground search neg

15-Feb-71   TAYLOR JAMES H.   ARMY

10-Mar-66   TAYLOR JAMES L.   ARMY

14-Sep-65   TAYLOR NEIL BROOKS   USN

15-Jul-71   TAYLOR TED J.   ARMY

06-Dec-70   TAYLOR WALTER J. JR.   ARMY

22-Jan-66   TEMPLIN ERWIN B. JR.   USN

09-Mar-70   TERLA LOTHAR G.   USAF

02-Oct-69   TERRELL KEAVIN L.   USN

31-Mar-71   TERRILL PHILIP B.   ARMY   Reported died in Tri Border area 04/71

03-May-68   TERRY ORAL R.   ARMY

29-Jan-66   TERRY RONALD T.   ARMY

13-Mar-67   TERWILLIGER VIRGIL BYRON   USMC

21-May-66   THACKERSON WALTER A.   ARMY

06-Jul-71   THOMAS DANIEL W.   USAF

14-Oct-66   THOMAS DARWIN JOEL   USN

29-Apr-75   THOMAS FERNANDO K.   CIV

03-Apr-68   THOMAS JAMES C.   USMC

25-Nov-71   THOMAS JAMES R.   USAF

25-Oct-68   THOMPSON BENJAMIN A.   ARMY   Lost in river

12-Aug-72   THOMPSON DAVID M.   USN

06-Feb-68   THOMPSON MELVIN C.   USN

01-Aug-68   THOMPSON WILLIAM J.   USAF

16-Jan-68   THOMPSON WILLIAM JOSEPH   USN

28-Jan-67   THORNTON WILLIAM D.   ARMY

29-Apr-75   THUY NHIEN TRIEU   CIV

15-Sep-66   TICE PAUL DOUGLAS   USMC

21-Mar-66   TIDERMAN JOHN M.   USN

21-Jul-66   TIFFIN RAINFORD   USAF

22-Aug-72   TIGNER LEE M.   USAF

05-SEP-63   TIK CHUI TO   CIV   Not on Official lists – (CIA) Air America

15-Nov-66   TIMMONS BRUCE ALLAN   USN

02-Jul-68   TIPPING HENRY ALBERT   USAF

26-Apr-68   TODD LARRY RICHARD   USAF

09-May-67   TODD ROBERT JACY   USMC

21-Nov-65   TOMS DENNIS L.   USN

27-Dec-71   TOWNLEY ROY F.   CIV

16-Sep-69   TRAMPSKI DONALD J.   ARMY

22-Mar-71   TRAVER JOHN G. III   ARMY

06-Feb-68   TRAVIS LYNN M.   USN

07-Oct-66   TREECE JAMES A.   USAF

13-May-70   TRENT ALAN R.   USAF   (Photo)

06-Apr-68   TRIMBLE JAMES M.   USMC

07-Jul-67   TRITT JAMES FRANCIS   USN   Lost overboard

04-Apr-68   TRIVELPIECE STEVE M.   ARMY   Reported KIA by gunfire, remains left behind

17-Apr-66   TROMP WILLIAM L.   USN

26-Dec-69   TROWBRIDGE DUSTIN C.   USN

26-Oct-71   TRUDEAU ALBERT R.   ARMY   4 remains found at crash site, not subjs

07-Jan-68   TRUJILLO ROBERT S.   ARMY

15-Jan-70   TUBBS GLENN E.   ARMY

26-Apr-66   TUCKER JAMES H.   USAF

24-Dec-71   TUCKER TIMOTHY M.   USAF

20-Jun-66   TUNNELL JOHN W.   USN

06-Nov-68   TURNER FREDERICK RAY   USMC

09-Oct-69   TURNER JAMES H.   ARMY

17-Sep-72   TUROSE MICHAEL STEPHEN   USAF   (Photo)

02-Oct-69   TYE MICHAEL J.   USN

24-Oct-68   TYLER GEORGE E.   USAF

11-Jun-67    UHLMANSIEK RALPH E.    ARMY

29-Apr-75    UNDERWOOD F.    CIV

21-Mar-70   UNDERWOOD THOMAS W.   USMC

05-Dec-65   UPNER EDWARD C.   ARMY   Reported KIA in ground combat, remains not recovered

28-May-71   URQUHART PAUL D.   ARMY

26-Jan-69   UTLEY RUSSEL K.   USAF

10-Dec-64    VADEN WOODROW W.    USAF   Remains possibly comingled with Viets

09-May-68    VAN ARTSDALEN CLIFFORD V.    ARMY

24-Jun-65   VAN CAMPEN THOMAS C.   ARMY   Wounded, became separated from unit

22-Apr-69    VAN CLEAVE WALTER SHELBY   USAF

02-Dec-69   VANDEN EYKEL MARTIN D. II   ARMY   Group burial with no positive Id

14-Oct-67   VAUGHAN ROBERT REDDINGTON   USN

02-Oct-69   VIADO REYNALDO R.   USN

30-May-62   VIETTI ELANOR A.   CIV   Taken from Leprosarium

11-May-66   VILLEPONTEAUX JAMES H. JR.   USMC

22-Nov-65   VISCONTI FRANCIS E.   USMC

05-MAY-70   VISOT MICHEL   CIV

01-Feb-66   VLAHAKOS PETER G.   USMC

18-Sep-65    VOGT LEONARD F. JR.   USN

27-Mar-72   WAGNER RAYMOND A.   USAF

31-MAY-70   WAKU YOSHIHIKO   CIV   Not on Official Lists

07-Apr-72   WALKER BRUCE C.   USAF   Reported evaded for 11 days, NVA approaching

02-Oct-64   WALKER KENNETH E.   USAF

31-Jan-67   WALKER LLOYD F.   USAF   No sign of subj

15-Jul-69   WALKER MICHAEL S.   USAF

13-Dec-68   WALKER SAMUEL F.   USAF   Mid air collision, parachute observed

07-Apr-66    WALKER THOMAS TAYLOR   USAF

20-Apr-68   WALKER WILLIAM J.   USMC

18-May-66   WALL JERRY M.   USAF

25-Jan-67   WALLACE ARNOLD B.   ARMY

28-Aug-67   WALLACE CHARLES FRANKLIN   USMC

19-Apr-68   WALLACE MICHAEL J.   ARMY

25-Apr-75   WALSH BRIAN   CIV   Led away at gunpoint by communists

15-Feb-69   WALSH RICHARD A.   USAF

10-May-69   WALTERS WILLIAM   ARMY

13-Jun-69  WARD NEAL CLINTON  USAF

18-Dec-72   WARD RONALD J.   USAF

04-Nov-69   WARE JOHN A.   ARMY

26-Oct-69   WARREN GARY D.   USAF   (Photo)

17-Jun-66   WASHBURN LARRY E.   USAF

08-Oct-69   WATKINS ROBERT J. JR.   ARMY

18-Jun-65   WATSON FRANK P.   USAF

13-Mar-68   WATSON JIMMY L.   ARMY

18-Feb-71   WATSON RONALD L.   ARMY   Reported KIA in crash, remains tagged but not recovered

18-Aug-71   WEAKS MELVIN L.   ARMY   

08-Nov-67   WEATHERMAN EARL C.   USMC   Reported died during escape 04/01/68

01-Nov-66   WEAVER GEORGE R. JR.   USN

22-Oct-65   WEGER JOHN JR.   USAF

22-Apr-66   WEIMORTS ROBERT F.   USN

10-Oct-69   WEISNER FRANKLIN L.   ARMY

27-Dec-71   WEISSENBACK EDWARD J.  CIV

12-Feb-67   WEISSMUELLER COURTNEY E.   USAF

23-Mar-61   WEITKAMP EDGAR WILKEN   ARMY

25-May-69   WEITZ MONEK   USMC

16-Jan-67   WELCH ROBERT J.  USAF

17-Aug-70   WELLONS PHILLIP ROGERSON   USAF

22-Jul-66   WELLS ROBERT J.   ARMY

07-Jan-69   WELSH LARRY D.   ARMY

03-Mar-68   WELSHAN JOHN T.   USAF

19-Apr-68   WERDEHOFF MICHAEL M.   ARMY

02-Jan-70   WEST JOHN T.   USAF

30-Mar-72   WESTCOTT GARY P.   ARMY

05-Oct-68   WESTER ALBERT D.   USAF

23-Mar-61   WESTON OSCAR B. JR.   USAF

17-May-70   WESTWOOD NORMAN P. JR.   USN

21-Apr-70   WHEELER EUGENE L.   USMC   Voice contact, in shootout

29-Jan-68   WHITE CHARLES E.   ARMY   Reported impaled

24-Nov-69   WHITE JAMES B.   USAF   (Photo)

02-Nov-69   WHITFORD LAWRENCE W. JR.   USAF

01-May-68   WHITMIRE WARREN T. JR.   ARMY

23-Mar-72   WHITT JAMES E.   USAF

27-Mar-68   WHITTEKER RICHARD LEE   USAF

11-Apr-68   WHITTEMORE FREDERICK H.   USN

24-Sep-66   WHITTLE JUNIOR L.   ARMY   Reported drowned while swimming

16-Dec-65   WICKHAM DAVID W. II   USN

12-May-68   WIDDISON IMLAY S.   ARMY

12-May-68   WIDNER DANNY L.   ARMY

16-Nov-68   WIECHERT ROBERT CHARLES   USAF

21-Jan-73   WIEHR RICHARD D.   USN   Reported overboard

07-Jun-70   WILBRECHT KURT MICHAEL   USMC

19-Apr-68   WILBURN JOHN E.   ARMY

06-May-72   WILES MARVIN B.   USN

12-Jun-72   WILEY RICHARD D.   ARMY

17-Jan-68   WILKE ROBERT F.   USAF

08-Feb-69   WILKINS CALVIN WAYNE   USMC

17-Apr-69   WILLETT ROBERT V. JR.   USAF

29-Apr-75   WILLIAMS DANNY MUY   CIV

03-Oct-66   WILLIAMS EDDIE L.   ARMY

03-Apr-72   WILLIAMS EDWARD W.   ARMY

25-May-69   WILLIAMS LEROY C.   USMC

11-May-72   WILLIAMS ROBERT J.   ARMY

12-May-68   WILLIAMS ROY C.   ARMY

21-Jul-68   WILLING EDWARD A.   USMC

26-Feb-66   WILLS FRANCIS D.   ARMY

04-Jun-70   WILSON HARRY TRUMAN   USMC

19-Oct-70   WILSON PETER J.   ARMY

14-Jun-71   WILSON RICHARD JR.   ARMY

02-Jul-67   WILSON WAYNE VASTER   USMC

22-Nov-65   WINKLER JOHN ANTHONY   USN

19-Jul-66   WINTERS DARRYL G.   USAF

21-Apr-67   WINTERS DAVID M.   ARMY   Disappeared while on Sampan

23-Dec-70   WISEMAN BAIN W. JR.   ARMY

09-May-65   WISTRAND ROBERT C.   USAF

16-Feb-69   WOGAN WILLIAM M.   ARMY

28-Jun-66   WOLFE THOMAS HUBERT   USAF

09-Aug-68   WOLFKEIL WAYNE B.   USAF

01-Mar-66   WOLOSZYK DONALD J.   USN

20-Oct-67   WOMACK LONNIE H.   USN   Listed AWOL, not heard of since 10/24/67

27-Mar-72   WONG EDWARD PUCK KOW   ARMY

16-Jan-66   WOOD DON C.   USAF   Positive Id in PL film (Photo)

06-Feb-67   WOOD PATRICK H.   USAF

02-Jun-67   WOOD REX S.   USN

02-May-66   WOOD WALTER S.   USN

02-Sep-72   WOOD WILLIAM C. JR.   USAF

03-Nov-70   WOODS DAVID W.   ARMY

18-Feb-71   WOODS GERALD E.   ARMY   KIA in crash, remains tagged, no recovery

17-Apr-65   WOODWORTH SAMUEL ALEXANDER   USAF

19-Oct-65   WORCHESTER JOHN B.   USN   Radio contact lost

11-Mar-68   WORLEY DON F.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY CIV/LOCKHEED

02-Mar-66   WORST KARL EDWARD   USAF

01-Apr-72   WORTH JAMES F.   USMC

30-Dec-67   WORTHAM MURRAY LAMAR   USAF

06-May-70   WORTHINGTON RICHARD C.   ARMY

17-Jan-67   WOZNIAK FREDERICK J.   USAF   No trace of crew

 21-Feb-67   WRIGHT ARTHUR   ARMY

13-Nov-70   WRIGHT DAVID I.   USAF

17-Jan-67   WRIGHT GARY G.   USAF   No trace of crew

27-Feb-68   WRIGHT THOMAS T.   USAF

21-May-67   WROBLESKI WALTER F.   ARMY

10-Mar-66    XAVIER AUGUSTO MARIA    USMC

17-May-68   YOUNG CHARLES L.   ARMY

04-Apr-70   YOUNG JEFFREY J.   ARMY

25-Aug-67    ZAVOCKY JAMES JOHN    USN

27-Feb-67   ZEMPLE RONALD L.   USN

15-Apr-66   ZERBE MICHAEL R.   USN

03-Apr-72   ZICH LARRY A.   ARMY

29-Aug-69   ZIMMER JERRY ALLEN   USMC

24-Apr-72   ZOLLICOFFER FRANKLIN   ARMY

17-Sep-72   ZORN THOMAS ONEAL JR.   USAF

01-Mar-71   ZUBKE DELAND D.   ARMY

20-Apr-68   ZUTTERMAN JOSEPH A. JR.   USMC

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part VII, R-S


In continuation of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, I will continue to list the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

 

18-Oct-66   RACKLEY INZAR M.    USAF

31-May-66   RAGLAND DAYTON W.   USAF

14-May-66   RALSTON FRANK D. III   USAF   (Photo)

23-May-69   RAMIREZ ARMANDO   ARMY

23-Jan-68   RAMSDEN GERALD LEE   USN

29-Apr-75   RANDOLPH CLIFFORD   CIV   Left Saigon 05/75

15-May-79   RAPP JEFF   CIV   Released Algernon s/v 07/79

16-Oct-69   RATTIN DENNIS M.   ARMY

16-Apr-70   RAUSCH ROBERT E.   USAF

15-Nov-66   RAVENNA HARRY M. III   ARMY

29-Dec-65   RAWSTHORNE EDGAR A.   USN

18-Mar-68   RAY JAMES M.   ARMY   (Photo)

13-Nov-69   RAY RONALD E.   ARMY

05-Sep-67   RAYMOND PAUL D.   USAF   (Photo)

24-Aug-68   READ CHARLES H. JR.   USAF

24-Jul-70   REED JAMES W.   USAF

29-Apr-75   REED THERESA   CIV   Left Saigon 06/76

16-Jan-68   REEDY WILLIAM HENRY JR.   USN

23-Dec-66   REEVES JOHN HOWARD   USMC

29-Apr-75   REGAN JOHN D.   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   REGAN LON THI   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

09-Nov-67   REHN GARY LEE   USMC

12-Jan-67   REINECKE WAYNE CONRAD   USN

25-Sep-66   REITER DEAN W.   USMC

20-Nov-69   RENELT WALTER A.   USAF

03-Jul-66    RENO RALPH J.   ARMY

09-Mar-69   REX ROBERT F.   USAF

03-Apr-68   REXROAD RONALD REUEL   USAF

21-Nov-67   REYNOLDS DAVID R.   ARMY

26-Apr-72   REYNOLDS TERRY L.   CIV

03-Jan-71   RHODES FERRIS A JR.   ARMY

02-May-70   RICHARDSON DALE W.   ARMY   Acft found, no trace of subj

30-Nov-65   RICHARDSON STEPHEN G.   USN

16-May-68   RICKEL DAVID J.   USAF   (Photo)

28-Oct-68   RICKER WILLIAM E.   USN

25-Dec-72   RICKMAN DWIGHT G.   USMC   Reported buried at crash w/ Viet observer

22-Apr-68   RIGGINS ROBERT P.   USAF

11-Jun-67   RIGGS THOMAS F.   ARMY

10-Nov-66   RIORDAN JOHN M.   USN

29-Apr-75   RIOS JOSE   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

27-Dec-71   RITTER GEORGE L.   CIV

29-Apr-75   RIVERA FREDERICK   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

12-Nov-67   ROARK JAMES D.   USN

07-Apr-65   ROARK WILLIAM MARSHALL   USN   Remains not returned as reported on 03/77

22-Jun-69   ROBERSON JOHN W.   ARMY

18-Jun-65   ROBERTS HAROLD J. JR.   USAF

25-Mar-69   ROBERTS RICHARD D.   ARMY

20-May-68   ROBERTSON JOHN H.   ARMY

10-Feb-71   ROBERTSON MARK J.   ARMY

09-Mar-70   ROBINSON EDWARD   ARMY

12-Mar-69   ROBINSON FLOYD H.   ARMY

05-Jan-70   ROBINSON LARRY WARREN   USMC

29-Apr-75   RODILL DANIEL   CIV   Expelled from Saigon 08/75

12-Feb-68   ROE JERRY L.   ARMY

18-Jan-68   ROEHRICH RONALD L.   USN

01-Dec-69   ROGERS BILLIE LEE   USN

04-May-67   ROGERS CHARLES E.   USAF

12-Mar-68   ROGERS EDWARD F.   USMC

27-Aug-70   ROGERS LYLE D.   ARMY

19-Mar-68   ROMERO VICTOR   USAF

17-Jun-66   ROMIG EDWARD L.   USN

02-Jun-66   ROSATO JOSEPH FRANK   USAF

05-Mar-70   ROSENBACH ROBERT P.   USAF

01-Aug-68   ROSS JOESPH S.   USAF   (Photo)

25-Mar-71   ROSSANO RICHARD J.   ARMY

27-Jun-65   ROTH BILLIE L.   USAF

3-Jun-70   ROZO JAMES M.   ARMY

24-May-68   RUCKER EMMETT JR.   USAF

30-Jun-67   RUNNELS GLYN L. JR.   USMC

16-Jun-68   RUPINSKI BERNARD FRANCIS   USN

26-Apr-72   RUSSELL RICHARD L.   USAF

11-May-69   RYAN WILLIAM C. JR.   USMC

09-Jun-70   RYDER JOHN L.   USAF   (Photo)

18-Aug-66   RYKOSKEY EDWARD J.   USMC

28-Apr-68    SAAVEDRA ROBERT    USN

 30-Jun-70   SADLER MITCHELL OLEN JR.    USAF

10-Jun-65   SAEGAERT DONALD R.   ARMY   Last seen on ground under fire

23-Jun-69   SAGE LELAND C.   USN

31-MAY-70   SAKAI KOJIRO   CIV   Not on Official DIA list

02-Oct-69   SALAZAR FIDEL G.   USN

07-Jun-67   SALE HAROLD R.   USAF

30-Jun-70   SANDERS WILLIAMS S.   USAF

12-May-68   SANDS RICHARD E.   ARMY

10-Dec-64   SANSONE DOMINICK   ARMY   Mixed (Viet?) remains returned 07/17/84

10-Aug-72   SANSONE JAMES J.   USN

27-Feb-67   SAUSE BERNARD J. JR.   USN   Blown off carrier

17-Jun-66   SAVOY M.J.   USN

20-Mar-68   SAYRE LESLIE B.   ARMY

03-Jan-73   SCAIFE KENNETH DOYLE   USN

24-Aug-67   SCHELL RICHARD J.   ARMY

29-Dec-68   SCHERDIN ROBERT F.   ARMY   Severely wounded when left

01-Mar-68   SCHEURICH THOMAS E.   USN

12-Jul-67   SCHIELE JAMES F.   ARMY

18-Feb-69   SCHIMMELS EDDIE R.   USN

15-Aug-70   SCHMIDT PETER A.   ARMY

09-Jun-68   SCHMIDT WALTER R. JR.   USMC   Reported alive on ground

23-May-67   SCHMITTOU EUREKA LAVERN   USN

10-Nov-66   SCHODERER ERIC J.   USN

09-Mar-70   SCHOEPPNER LEONARD J.   USN

16-Jan-66   SCHOONOVER CHARLES D.   USN

18-Feb-66   SCHROEFFEL THOMAS ANTHONY   USN

15-Dec-69   SCHUMACHER JAMES K.   ARMY

16-Jun-65   SCHUMANN JOHN R.   ARMY   Egress: reported working slave labor on rice mill

09-Apr-67   SCHWORER RONALD P.   ARMY

21-Aug-67   SCOTT DAIN V.   USN

25-Apr-68   SCOTT DAVID L.   ARMY   KIA in ambush, remains left behind

15-Mar-66   SCOTT MARTIN R.   USAF

13-May-69   SCOTT MIKE J.   ARMY

22-Apr-69   SCOTT VINCENT CALVIN JR   USAF

16-Mar-71   SCRIVENER STEPHEN RUSSELL   USAF

12-Mar-70   SCULL GARY B.   ARMY

04-Nov-66   SCUNGIO VINCENT A.   USAF

21-Dec-67   SCURLOCK LEE D.   ARMY

18-Jul-68   SEABLOM EARL F.   ARMY

30-Apr-72   SEAGRAVES MELVIN DOUGLAS   USN

25-Nov-67   SEARFUS WILLIAM HENRY   USN

16-Mar-71   SEELEY DOUGLAS MILTON   USAF

12-Mar-75   SEIDL ROBERT   CIV   Air Vietnam crash

22-Jan-66   SENNETT ROBERT R.   USN

02-Apr-72   SEREX HENRY M.   USAF

23-Aug-68   SETTERQUIST FRANCIS L.   USAF   (Photo)

06-Jun-72   SEUELL JOHN W.   USAF

15-Mar-71   SEXTON DAVID M.   ARMY

03-Jul-67   SEYMOUR LEO E.   ARMY   (Photo)

19-Apr-68   SHAFER PHILIP R.   ARMY

24-May-68   SHANKS JAMES LEE   USAF

03-Mar-68   SHANNON PATRICK LEE   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY CIV/LOCKHEED – 12/07/2005 – Family releases to (FOX NEWS) media fact that remains have been I.D.’d

05-Sep-74   SHARMAN NEIL   CIV

05-Sep-65   SHAW EDWARD B.   USN

11-Nov-67   SHAW GARY F.   ARMY   Body gone

08-Oct-70   SHAY DONALD E. JR.   USAF   (Photo)

20-Apr-65   SHEA JAMES PATRICK   USN

29-Apr-75   SHEA MICHAEL J.   USMC

29-Apr-65   SHELTON CHARLES E.   USAF   Radio contact, reported died as POW (Photo)

05-FEB-69   SHERBURN HUGH L.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list

03-Nov-70   SHEWMAKE JOHN D. SR.   ARMY

10-Feb-71   SHIMAMOTO KEIZABURO   CIV

09-Dec-68   SHIMEK SAMUEL D.   ARMY

12-Jul-72   SHIMKIN ALEX   CIV   

28-Jan-70   SHINN WILLIAM C.   USAF   

18-Oct-66   SHONECK JOHN R.   USAF   

09-Jun-66   SHORACK THEODORE JAMES JR   USAF  

24-Apr-69   SHRIVER JERRY M.   ARMY 

17-Jun-66   SIEGWARTH DONALD E.   USN   

25-Apr-71   SIGAFOOS WALTER H. III   USAF   (Photo)

29-Mar-72   SIMMONS ROBERT E.   USAF   Remains Returned 03/01/86 – family did not accept ID – group burial -6/17/2010

16-Aug-75   SIMMONS WILLIE E.   CIV   Released 1975?

12-May-68   SIMPSON JOSEPH L.   ARMY   

24-Jan-67   SIMPSON MAX C.   ARMY   

28-Aug-62   SIMPSON ROBERT LEWIS   USAF   

21-May-67   SIMPSON WALTER S.   ARMY   

26-Jan-69   SINGLETON DANIEL E.   USAF   

28-JAN-68   SINGSON WILFREDO D.   USMC   

15-Jan-68   SKARMAN ORVAL H.   USMC   No return from R&R

16-May-70   SKEEN RICHARD ROBERT   USN   

02-Mar-70   SKIBBE DAVID W.   USMC   

19-Dec-71   SKILES THOMAS W.   ARMY   

12-Dec-70   SKINNER OWEN G.   USAF   

06-Mar-67   SMALL BURT C.   ARMY   Reported wounded and captured

16-Jun-73   SMALLWOOD JOHN J.   USAF   

20-Jul-69   SMILEY STANLEY K.   USN   

01-May-67   SMITH CARL ARTHUR   USMC   

15-Mar-67   SMITH DEAN JR.   USN   

03-Apr-65   SMITH GEORGE C.   USAF   

08-Jan-68   SMITH HALLIE W.   USAF   

12-Nov-69   SMITH HARRY WINFIELD   USAF 

30-Sep-68   SMITH HOWARD H.   USAF   

04-Apr-71   SMITH JOSEPH S.   USAF   

30-May-68   SMITH LEWIS P. II   USAF   

19-Aug-69   SMITH ROBERT N.   USMC   

28-Nov-70   SMITH RONALD E.   ARMY   

17-Jan-69   SMITH VICTOR A.   USAF   (Photo)

22-Jun-66   SMITH WARREN P. JR.   USAF

23-Jul-66   SMITH WILLIAM W.   USAF   

10-Mar-71   SMOOT CURTIS R.   ARMY   

28-Apr-70   SNIDER HUGHIE F.   ARMY   

23-May-67   SOUCY RONALD PHILIP   USN   

01-May-67   SOULIER DUWAYNE   USMC   

17-May-71   SOYLAND DAVID P.   ARMY   

05-Feb-66   SPARENBERG BERNARD JOHN   USN   

19-Mar-71   SPARKS JON M.   ARMY   

07-Jun-68   SPENCER DEAN C. III   ARMY   

27-Sep-66   SPILMAN DYKE A.   USAF   

21-Apr-68   SPINDLER JOHN GATES   USMC   

30-Sep-68   SPINELLI DOMENICK A.   USN   

24-Jan-66   SPRICK DOYLE R.   USMC   

03-Mar-68   SPRINGSTEADAH DONALD K.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list TDY CIV/LOCKHEED

03-Jun-67   SPRINGSTON THEODORE JR.   USAF

10-Jan-69   SPROTT ARTHUR R. JR.   USAF   

22-May-68   ST PIERRE DEAN PAUL   USAF   

30-Apr-68   STAEHLI BRUCE W.   USMC   

21-Nov-72   STAFFORD RONALD D.   USAF   

03-Feb-71   STANDERWICK ROBERT L. SR.   USAF   

06-Feb-69   STANLEY CHARLES I.   ARMY

01-Apr-67   STANLEY ROBERT W.   USAF   

02-Dec-66   STARK WILLIE E.   ARMY   

11-Nov-67   STATON ROBERT M. JR.   ARMY   Body gone

26-Nov-71   STEADMAN JAMES E.   USAF   (Photo)

31-May-66   STEEN MARTIN W.   USAF   Good chute, harness empty

28-Feb-68   STEGMAN THOMAS   USN   

08-May-67   STEIMER THOMAS JACK   USN   

05-Feb-70   STEPHENSON RICHARD C.   USN

29-Apr-75   STEVENS F.   CIV   

14-Feb-69   STEVENS LARRY J.   USN   

24-Mar-67   STEWART JACK T.   ARMY   

08-Feb-71   STEWART PAUL C.   ARMY   

15-Mar-66   STEWART PETER J.   USAF   

12-May-67   STEWART ROBERT A.   USAF   

17-May-69   STEWART VIRGIL G.   USAF   

27-Sep-66   STINE JOSEPH M.   USAF   

14-Sep-66   STODDARD CLARENCE W. JR   USN   

07-Jan-68   STONE JAMES M.   ARMY   

28-Oct-68   STONEBRAKER KENNETH A.   USAF   

13-Jun-69   STORY JAMES C.   ARMY   

10-Jan-67   STOVES MERRITT III   ARMY

26-Apr-68   STOW LILBURN RAY   USAF   

21-Mar-68   STOWERS AUBREY E. JR.   USAF   

18-Oct-70   STRAIT DOUGLAS F.   ARMY   

18-Jan-64   STRALEY JOHN L.   ARMY   

04-Mar-71   STRAWN JOHN T.   ARMY   

05-Oct-68   STRIDE JAMES D. JR.   ARMY   

30-Nov-70   STRINGER JOHN C. II   ARMY   

03-Feb-73   STRINGHAM WILLIAM STERLIN   USN   

11-May-72   STROBRIDGE RODNEY L.   ARMY   

22-Jun-71   STROHLEIN MADISON A.   ARMY   Indications of shootout with NVA

25-May-72   STRONG HENRY H.   USN   

28-Oct-68   STROVEN WILLIAM H.   USAF   

20-Dec-72   STUART JOHN F.   USAF   

20-Oct-69   STUBBS WILLIAM W.   ARMY   

11-Nov-67   STUCKEY JOHN S. JR.   ARMY   Body gone

27-Nov-68   STUIFBERGEN GENE PAUL   USAF   

12-May-68   STULLER JOHN C.   ARMY   Ground attack

15-Nov-69   SUBER RANDOLPH B.   ARMY   

02-Dec-66   SULANDER DANIEL A.   ARMY   

12-Feb-67   SULLIVAN MARTIN J.   USN   

12-Jul-67   SULLIVAN ROBERT J.   ARMY   

31-Dec-71   SUTTER FREDERICK J.   USAF   

28-Jan-70   SUTTON WILLIAM C.   USAF   

09-Oct-69   SUYDAM JAMES L.   ARMY   

15-Jun-67   SWANSON JOHN WILLARD   USAF   

31-Oct-68   SWANSON ROGER W.   ARMY   

05-Feb-69   SWIGART PAUL E. JR.   USN   

18-Mar-68   SWITZER JERROLD A.   USMC   

30-Dec-67   SWORDS SMITH III   USAF   

04-Apr-67   SZEYLLER EDWARD PHILIP   USN

Photo credit: www.emaze.com

 

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part VI, N-Q


In continuation of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, I will continue to list the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

03-Aug-67    NAHAN JOHN B. III    USMC    Extracted survivors said subj dead

16-MAR-62   NAU GEORGE   CIV

31-Jul-69   NEAL DENNIS P.   ARMY

04-Jan-69   NEELD BOBBY G.   USAF

20-Feb-69   NEISLAR DAVID PHILLIP   USN

17-Sep-67   NELLANS WILLIAM L.   USAF

11-Jun-67   NELSON JAMES R.   ARMY

11-Apr-70   NELSON JAN HOUSTON   USMC

16-Jan-66   NETH FRED A.   USN

18-Jun-65   NEVILLE WILLIAM E.   USAF

29-Sep-68   NEWBERRY WAYNE E.   USAF   (Photo)

29-Aug-67   NEWBURN LARRY S.   ARMY

06-Feb-68   NEWMAN JAMES C. JR.   USN

26-Feb-66   NEWTON DONALD S.   ARMY

29-Apr-75   NGUYEN THI THI CHIN   CIV

29-Apr-75   NGUYEN VAN CHIEN   CIV

29-Apr-75   NGUYEN XWAN ANH-TRU   CIV

01-Sep-66   NICHOLS HUBERT C.   USAF

22-Apr-66   NICKERSON WILLIAM B.   USN

26-Oct-71   NICKOL ROBERT A.   ARMY

21-Apr-67   NIDDS DANIEL R.   ARMY   Disappeared while on Sampan

15-Feb-69   NIEDECKEN WILLIAM CLINTON   USN

17-Mar-68   NIGHTENGALE RANDALL J.   USN

21-Nov-64   NIPPER DAVID   USMC

20-Jul-66   NOBERT CRAIG R.   USAF   Egress reports Means told by “The Eel” that Norbert died after capture

16-May-71   NOLAN JOSEPH P. JR.   ARMY

09-Nov-67   NOLAN MCKINLEY   ARMY   Last seen 11/02/73

14-Jul-66   NOPP ROBERT   ARMY

20-Dec-65   NORDAHL LEE E.   USN

03-Nov-70   NORRIS CALVIN A.   ARMY

03-Nov-69   NORTON MICHAEL R.   ARMY

23-Jun-66   NYMAN LAWRENCE F.   USN

02-Dec-66   NYSTROM BRUCE A.   USN

29-Apr-75   NYSTUL WILLIAM CRAIG  USMC

10-Nov-66    O’BRIEN JOHN LAWRENCE    USAF

09-Jan-69    O’BRIEN KEVIN    USAF

12-Jul-72   O’DONNELL SAMUEL JR.   USAF

10-Apr-67   O’GRADY JOHN F.   USAF   Ejected, no radio contact

03-Apr-72   O’NEIL DOUGLAS L.   ARMY

29-Oct-71   OAKLEY LINUS LABIN   USAF

07-Jan-70   OCHAB ROBERT   USAF

18-Oct-67   OGDEN HOWARD JR.   USMC

03-Jan-71   OKERLUND THOMAS R.   ARMY

11-Jun-67   OLDHAM JOHN S.   USMC

11-Mar-68   OLDS ERNEST A.   USAF   Seen alive in German Propaganda film

17-Oct-65   OLMSTEAD STANLEY E.   USN

21-Apr-68   OLSEN FLOYD W.   ARMY

26-Sep-68   OLSON BARRY A.   ARMY

13-Mar-66   OLSON GERALD E.   USAF

05-FEB-68   OLSON ROBERT E.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list

03-Jan-71   OMELIA DENNIS W.   ARMY

13-Oct-68   ORELL QUINLEN R.   USN

24-Sep-65   OSBORN GEOFFREY H.   USN

04-Mar-71   OSBORNE RODNEY D.   ARMY

27-Apr-67   OSBORNE SAMUEL WILLIAM JR.   USMC

12-May-72   OSTERMEYER WILLIAM H.   USAF

01-Sep-67   OTT EDWARD L. III   USN

02-Oct-67   OTT PATRICK L.   USMC

08-Oct-70   OTT WILLIAM A.   USAF

16-Aug-68   OVERLOCK JOHN F.   USAF

15-Dec-70   OWEN CLYDE C.   USN

23-May-68   OWEN ROBERT D.   ARMY

29-Jun-68   OWEN TIMOTHY S.   ARMY

10-Jun-65   OWENS FRED M.   ARMY

07-Jun-67   OWENS JOY L.   USAF

 07-Oct-66    PABST EUGENE M.    USAF

 10-Apr-68   PADGETT SAMUEL J.   ARMY

18-May-68   PADILLA DAVID E.   USMC

06-Aug-67   PAGE ALBERT L.   USAF

18-Jun-71   PAINTER JOHN R. JR.   USN

03-Jan-71   PALEN CARL A.   ARMY

22-Apr-68   PALMGREN EDWIN D.   USAF

27-Mar-72   PANNABECKER DAVID E.   USAF

03-Nov-70   PANTALL JAMES R.   ARMY

09-Mar-70   PARCELS REX L. JR.   USN

25-Jul-68   PARISH CHARLES C.   USN

21-Jan-73   PARKER CHARLES L. JR.   USN   Overboard

06-Feb-69   PARKER DAVID W.   ARMY

04-Mar-70   PARKER JOHN J.   USN

05-Apr-67   PARKER THOMAS A.   USN

13-Mar-66   PARKER UDON   ARMY

14-Jul-62   PARKS RAYMOND F.   ARMY

17-Jul-68   PARRA LIONEL JR.   USMC

03-Feb-66   PARSLEY EDWARD M.   USAF

19-Sep-66   PARSONS DON B.   USN

03-Jan-71   PARSONS MICHAEL D.   ARMY

01-Nov-69   PARTINGTON ROGER D.   USMC

13-Mar-66   PASEKOFF ROBERT E.   USAF

06-Dec-67   PASTVA MICHAEL JAMES   USMC   Misadventure in Quang Tri

27-Jul-67   PATTERSON BRUCE M.   USN

19-May-67   PATTERSON JAMES K.   USN   Probably captured with broken leg

16-Feb-71   PATTILLO RALPH N.   USAF

02-Feb-68   PATTON KENNETH J.   ARMY

27-Jul-68   PATTON WARD K.   USN

05-Feb-71   PAUL JAMES L.   ARMY

13-Mar-66   PAULEY MARSHALL I.   USAF

08-Mar-67   PAWLISH GEORGE F.   USN

05-Jun-72   PAYNE KYLIS THEROD   USN

19-Dec-68   PAYNE NORMAN   ARMY

31-Dec-67   PEACE JOHN D.   USN

12-Oct-72   PEACOCK JOHN R. II   USMC

17-May-71   PEARCE DALE A.   ARMY

23-Jun-70   PEDERSON JOE P.   ARMY

27-Apr-67   PENNINGTON RONALD KEITH   USMC

06-Apr-68   PEPPER ANTHONY JOHN   USMC

30-Aug-70   PERALTA BENJAMIN R.   ARMY

31-Dec-67   PERISHO GORDON S.   USN

14-Dec-71   PERKINS CECIL C.   ARMY

14-Dec-71   PERRY OTHA L.   ARMY

10-May-68   PERRY THOMAS H.   ARMY

09-Mar-66   PETERSON DELBERT R.   USAF

27-Jan-73   PETERSON MARK A.   USAF   Good chute, voice contact (Photo)

23-May-67   PETTIS THOMAS E.   USN

09-Apr-70    PFAFFMANN CHARLES B.   USN

07-Jul-66   PHARRIS WILLIAM V.   ARMY

23-Nov-71   PHELPS WILLIAM   USAF

07-Feb-68   PHILLIPS DANIEL R.   ARMY   Overun at SF Camp

28-Aug-68   PHILLIPS ELBERT AUSTIN   USAF

23-Jun-70   PHILLIPS ROBERT P.   ARMY

27-Aug-68   PICK DONALD WILLIAM   USAF

10-Jun-70   PIERCE WALTER M.   ARMY

15-Dec-70   PIERSANTI ANTHONY J. JR.   USN

13-Apr-69   PIERSON WILLIAM C.   ARMY

23-Mar-72   PIKE DENNIS S.   USN

12-Jul-69   PIKE PETER X.   USAF

19-Sep-66   PILKINGTON THOMAS H.   USN

22-Nov-65   PIRKER VICTOR J.   USMC

08-Dec-69   PIRRUCCELLO JOSEPH S.   USAF   (Photo)

12-May-67   PITMAN PETER P.   USAF

24-Jan-66   PITT ALBERT   USMC

28-Sep-66   PITTMAN ROBERT E.   ARMY

16-Nov-66   PITTMANN ALAN D.   USAF

11-Sep-70   PLASSMEYER BERNARD H.   USMC

10-Jun-67   PLATT ROBERT L. JR.   ARMY

05-Oct-65   POGREBA DEAN A.   USAF

29-Apr-75   POLARD PERRY   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

15-Jul-69   POLSTER HARMON   USAF

24-Mar-70   POOL JERRY L.   ARMY   Group I.D. No remains – family rejects

05-Sep-68   POSEY GEORGE R.   USN   Overboard

29-Apr-75   POSNER GERALD   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

05-Feb-68   POTTER WILLIAM T.   USAF

07-Apr-72   POTTS LARRY F.   USMC

02-Apr-69   POWERS LOWELL S.   ARMY

24-Dec-67   POWERS VERNIE H.   ARMY

05-Sep-67   PRATHER MARTIN WILLIAM   USMC

02-Oct-69   PRENTICE KENNETH M.   USN

01-Feb-66   PREVOST ALBERT M.   USMC

01-Aug-67   PREWITT WILLIAM ROLAND   USMC

03-Mar-68   PRICE DAVID STANLEY   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY/CIV LOCKHEED

12-Oct-72   PRICE WILLIAM M.   USMC

08-Sep-68   PRIDEMORE DALLAS R.   ARMY   Reported Kidnapped

02-Feb-68   PRINGLE JOE H.   ARMY   ID found at crash site

22-Dec-65   PRUDHOMME JOHN D.   USN

28-Jan-70   PRUETT WILLIAM D.   USAF

25-Mar-71   PUENTES MANUEL R.   ARMY   Seen alive in ambush

02-Feb-68   PUGGI JOSEPH D.   ARMY

19-Mar-70   PUGH DENNIS G.   USAF   (Photo)

22-Nov-69   QUINN MICHAEL E.   USN

22-Jan-74   QUINN JUDGE SOPHIE   CIV   Released from Quang Ngai 02/03/74

29-Apr-75   QUINN JUDGE SOPHIE   CIV   2nd time captured – Left Saigon 07/75

Photo credit: www.dailymail.co.uk