Peru: Miles and Miles of Beaches


Hiking the beaches of Supe Puerto in Peru with the caveman and our youngest son. That’s my little seizure-alert service dog, Abby, wrapped up from the cold. We started out with some general directions to an area where there were some old ruins. We never found them but, sometimes, a wrong turn is an adventure all its own.

We hiked all day and were the only three humans around. Vultures followed us. The gringa is certain they were waiting for us to drop dead. We discovered a lighthouse and rested in craggy inlets where the surf crashed into the rocks a few feet away from us and the spray would shoot way over our heads. The geography of this coastal area was that of a coastal desert. Although it was barren, it had its own rugged beauty and lonely, melancholy charm.

We hiked to a small island and stayed too long, The tide came in so quickly we almost got stranded. I got bootfuls of water slogging through the surf. Luckily my hand knitted wool leggings I had purchased from one of the local market stalls dried out pretty quickly.

We had a wonderful time and were absolutely exhausted by the time we got back to town.

Handcrafted From Peru


The caveman and the gringa traveled to Peru in 2013. We wandered to a beautiful town at the foot of the Andes called Chosica. It has a reputation of having sunshine year round and the coldest damn river running through town from the snow melts up in the mountains.The caveman played soccer there in his younger days and we were on a mission to find an old soccer buddy.

We wandered streets in the old neighborhood (hills, mind you, up and down for hours) knocking on doors and asking people if they knew “So and So”. They would point us in a direction and off we would go. From the many people we met in the streets and asked, we finally got lucky. A very friendly drunk fellow knew just the house we were looking for. I think he got confused and took a couple of wrong turns but we eventually got there. The caveman’s friend wasn’t home but we chatted with his daughter and exchanged phone numbers and addresses. We thought we would try again later.

Although we were exhausted from traipsing up and down “suburbia” for hours, we walked back to the town’s main attraction, a large, beautiful park. We visited the park and it was filled with people. We drank fresh pressed sugar cane juice and viewed the icy river rushing under a walk-over bridge. We saw an enormous statue of Jesus with a walk-under waterfall. We enjoyed some talented street performers, one of which played this beautiful handcrafted harp.

Eventually we called his friend but it was impossible for us to all get together that night. It would take three more days of the caveman waiting anxiously until, the very day we were to leave, he was able to meet with his very best friend that he had not seen in almost thirty years. Everyone cried. The only way our trip could have ended more perfectly was if we could have packed him up and brought him home with us. But, at least they now know where each other are and can keep in touch.

One Lonely Egg


Out on a sandbar exploring the river in la selva de Peru and we stumble upon this one lonely egg. That is most definitely the caveman’s hairy foot with the egg and not the gringa’s.

Dug-Out Canoes and Memories of Grandfather


My caveman and I deep in the jungles of Peru, in “la selva”. As a boy growing up he remembers his grandfather, from time to time, making a dug-out canoe just like these. His grandfather would take the caveman and his cousins out on the river and toss out some kind of explosive. Then he would tell the boys to dive for the fish. No playtime until dinner was gathered!

Cusco’s Alpaca Photo Hustlers


When the gringa and her caveman traveled to Cusco, Peru in 2010, we met David and his brother, Wilson. (The gringa is pretty certain these are aliases!) They had quite a photography racket. They usually hung around the Temple of the Sun. We stayed in the hotel directly across the street and our view of the main entrance enabled us to watch these two master hustlers at work. They nailed us the first time we stepped out of the hotel to explore. Their game was to allow their alpacas to just sort of wander around nearby. When someone would take a photo they would hustle over and ask for a few “sols”.  Then, usually the tourist, (ourselves included), would see them in colorful panchos and hats and ask for a picture of them as well. That cost a few more sols. When I took my photo of the whole team together, one of the alpacas decided to take a leak and create a puddle for my camera. I tell ya, the gringa just loved these guys.