A New Moon For A New Age


Most people think Earth’s moon is old news. However, what the public may not realize is that NASA has a rover active on the Moon, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LRO). The gringa will call the rover “Elroy” for your reading pleasure.

Elroy has a new exhibit on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. that reveals that our Moon is anything but boring. What with Mars and black holes and parallel universes getting so much attention, it’s easy for our little ol’ Moon to get lost in the mix. The gringa wants to give it some glory that is long overdue.

One thing that is interesting about the Moon is that it undergoes such frequent change. It seems to get blasted all the time by meteors and such. The images on display in the exhibit show the formation of new impact craters (kind of scary when the gringa considers its proximity to home! The Moon may very well be our shield!). Recent volcanic activity has also been detected. And, most curious of all, is evidence that the Moon’s core may be cooling which has caused it to shrink and crack the crust of the Moon’s surface.

Elroy is a busy little rover. So busy, in fact, that there are too many images for this single exhibit. So, in addition to the favorites that were selected for display, there is a large screen which projects lunar images that are updated daily.

Since 2009, in addition to a fabulous photography collection, Elroy has also collected environmental and geological data with the seven other instruments he is equipped with. Elroy’s mission is to map the entire surface of the Moon. Even the legendary “dark side” of the Moon.

You see, one reason the Moon remains so mysterious is because it has a “backside”. Yes, we never get to see the Moon’s rear-end. We always see only one physical side of the Moon. Now, this is not because the Moon hangs suspended in space and never rotates. It’s just that it has a rather peculiar rotation cycle.

Millions of years ago the Moon spun around much faster. The pull of Earth’s gravity has caused it to slow down. So much so that its rotation cycle now matches its orbit cycle.  These cycles take 27.3 Earth days. However, observed from Earth it takes 29.5 days. (Don’t expect the gringa to get into that mystery here! You can research it yourself by clicking on… Understanding the moon phases). So, since the orbit and rotation cycles are exactly matched, as the Moon travels about the Earth, at night, when we see it, the same side is always presented to Earth.

However, for serious stargazers with top-notch telescopes, you can get a peek at a sliver of the hidden aspects of the Moon. Since the Moon is not “round and flat” like a coin but is actually elliptical, like a ball, at just the right time there is a speed differential when the Moon is farthest from Earth, thereby its rotation speeds up a bit because of a little less gravity drag. This causes what scientists call a “rocking” motion and an extra nine percent of the Moon’s surface is visible. But now, thanks to Elroy, all Earthlings can see just exactly what is on the Moon’s backside which is not “dark” after all, except during the cycle of a full moon when the Earth is blocking all sunlight.

Only two years into its mission NASA declared Elroy a complete success. Over four billion measurements were used by Elroy to complete a topographical map of the entire Moon. Elroy’s instruments determined that the coldest spot in our entire solar system is right smack on the Moon. It is found inside the shadows of Hermite crater which is located near the north pole. It is a bitter minus 415 degrees Fahrenheit. The gringa hopes Elroy was wearing his mittens.

Elroy is not just taking photos and temperature readings. The rover is also looking for water deposits, such as ice, and searching for fuel resources such as hydrogen. In preparation for future manned Moon missions, environmental radiation levels are also recorded.

So, the next time you gaze up at the Moon, give Elroy a salute. He is still on the job!

 

Sources: www.nasa.gov, www.moonconnection.com

 

Image Source: http://www.nasa.gov

 

 

 

 

 

Photographers Named Curiosity & Opportunity


1curiosityAs the dear reader enjoys these other worldly images, please click on them to be swept away to a much larger, more panoramic view (except for one that stays tiny) of the digital Martian landscape artwork of Curiosity and Opportunity, NASA’s premier photographers.

Curiosity and Opportunity are not your average photographers. They are also  “Rover Environmental Monitoring Stations” (REMS). They rove around taking fantastic images of the Red Planet’s landscape while at the same time recording temperature and humidity data and measuring things like spikes of methane gas in the environment or evaluating the organic material in a sample of rock powder it collects with its robotic drill. Their work has discovered that today’s Mars is chemically active and ancient Mars harbored conditions that were favorable for the existence of life.

1st sampling hol mt sharp 9-24-14

When Curiosity landed on Mars, it was near Mount Sharp. There is an ancient lake bed near that mountain that is tens of millions of years old. Here’s a pic of a geological sampling hole drilled and photographed by Curiosity near Mount Sharp, September 24, 2014 (this pic stays this same size if you click on it, unlike the others that give you a much larger and more detailed image).

3curiosity

Curiosity, NASA’s photographer/geologist took a “selfie” as it prepared to drill and analyze geologic samples at “Windiana”.

 

4curiosity

Curiosity may be getting a bit narcissistic with its celebrity status and is becoming quite adept at taking “selfies”. The gringa just loves this! Back in August, Curiosity prepared to drill for geologic samples from a rock named “Buckskin”.

5curiosity

Opportunity snapped this image of Hinner’s Point located at the norther edge of Marathon Valley on August, 14, 2015 on day 4,108 of its Martian mission. The summit is named after Noel Hinners (1935-2014) who had an important role in training astronauts for the Apollo program and continued in different leadership roles within NASA throughout his career. Opportunity’s work in Marathon Valley discovered the presence of silica and iron.

6curiosity

The gringa will close this post with her favorite Martian photo so far, this beautiful sunset. Curiosity snapped this breathtaking image near Gale Crater on April 15, 2015, approximately day 965 of its mission.

Source and Photo credit: http://www.nasa.gov

Flowers or Death By Landslide


Lying on my back in the wet grass after a rainstorm in the Peruvian jungle, about two feet away from a forty foot drop into a raging river, with my heart in my throat imagining death by landslide, to take a picture of a beautiful flower. The caveman is in the background yelling, “What the hell are you doing?” The gringa is not in her right mind sometimes.