Mean Mermaids Are A Thing


Most of us think of mermaids as sexy sirens of the sea. There seems to be a new mermaid fad with gals and guys both living mer-folk fantasy lifestyles. There are mermaid performers, mermaid weddings, mermaid blankies, and all sorts of other mermaid related stuff. But guess what mermaids are really about? Murder and mayhem, folks, murder and mayhem. Hate to spoil it for all you romantic mer-folk but your fantasy heroes were really mean in the mythos of old. And I mean REALLY mean!


The animated Little Mermaid movie by Disney, that inspires little girls to be sweet and hopeful and determined, is based on a Hans Christian Anderson tale from the 19th century. But the original story was far from a child-appropriate fairy tale.

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Yes, there was a mermaid princess and a drowning prince. But there was also romantic rejection and an ensuing plot for a blood bath. Once the prince turns the little mermaid princess down, she begins to die of a broken heart. But mermaid’s have no souls so they don’t go to heaven. Instead, they are transformed into the sea foam that tips raging waves and breakers.


But the transformation takes awhile. It’s a process. So, for awhile, there’s a chance to save the little mermaid from this terrible destiny. In the early stages, while she is tail-less and mute, she places her hope in someone, anyone, to take action to save her.


Seeing this horrible fate come upon their sister, the little mermaid’s faithful sisters do not disappoint. They become enraged. They swear vengeance. They negotiate a deal with a sea hag. 


She demands their mermaid hair in exchange for a poisoned, cursed dagger that can only be used while the human prince sleeps. His blood must be collected and washed over the little mermaid’s feet which will cause her tail to grow back. The sisters return with the blade and tell their sister what must be done. 


With the dagger in hand, the little mermaid stands over the unsuspecting prince who jilted her while he sleeps. She struggles silently with her conscience. Much time passes. In the end, the little mermaid can’t go through with it. But is she still destined to become lonely sea foam? Not so fast.


It seems that there are still heavenly rewards for soul-less mer-folk who opt out of murder. Angels suddenly appear and give her an option. Instead of becoming meaningless sea foam, she can remain human. It will just cost her a few centuries of good deeds. Then, she will have earned an immortal soul.


Now, that doesn’t seem like too mean of a mermaid, does it. Well, on the flip side, there are tales of much meaner sirens of the sea.


Like Japan’s sea-vampiress Nure Onna who’s mer-body resembles a sea snake more than a fish. She also has fangs amid the human teeth in her lovely smile. She likes to sit on the shore pretending to hold a baby as she cries in distress. What sympathetic human wouldn’t offer assistance? 


She asks them to hold her baby which becomes a weight pinning them down so she can drain their blood at her leisure. And if death by exsanguination isn’t bad enough, if you happen to have long hair she might just strangle you with it. Bad, bad mermaid.

And don’t forget about mer-men. Those are some bad boys, too. The Scots tell of the Blue Men who make friends with sailors. When ships get close enough to recognize the un-natural blue skin, it’s too late. The Blue Men attack, drag the sailors into the water and eat them. Great Scott! Cannibal Mer-men! Who knew?!

The Odyssey, of course, shares the most familiar mean mermaid story of sexy sea sirens who lure sailors to their deaths. They sing songs that hypnotize them, drawing them ever closer to the source of the song… Mermaids sitting atop rocks, rocks that will wreck their ships. Then, BOOM, you’re dead.


But where did the first mermaid come from? Who is the Eve of the seas? Ancient Syrians tell of Atargatis, a goddes who fell in love with a human. This story again? 


While loving him she lost control of her super-human goddess strength and killed her lover. Overcome with guilt and grief, surprise, she drowns herself in the sea. 


But didn’t she know she was a goddess? Like, immortal? Well, it seems that immortality is not the only rule gods and goddesses live by. It seems that there is a rule that when they jump into the ocean they automatically turn into fish. But the magic works out strangely on those who are incredibly beautiful, like Atargatis. She kept her human beauty and only became half-fish. The first mermaid.

Russians have their own lore about the mer-people, rusalki. They believe them to be the reincarnated souls of vengeful women who have died tragically, like from pregnancy, suicide or murder. So you can imagine that these kind of mermaids would be really, really mean. 


They lure you near with their gorgeousness. They put you at ease with soothing words. Then, WHAM! They grab you and drown you. But a few have an even more demented way of killing their victims. They tickle them so that their victims drown by laughter. Sick. Very, very sick.


The Irish have their selkies seal-women and the French have their mermaid dragons called the melusine, as well as fat mer-monk creatures. There are also tales of mer-zombies. The Arabian Nights includes a story featuring a terrifying mermaid kingdom. 


It seems that the entire ancient world has been fascinated with the prospect of beautiful but deadly mer-people. It seems that sweet, adorable, kindly little mermaid princesses are only a modern creation. Does that mean that, as a race, humanity is taking a turn for the better instead of a turn for the worst? Could be. The gringa remains hopeful yet firmly a land-lubber. Just in case. 


Image Credits:

Deviant Art

Good Reads


Video Credits

Creepy World

NightTerrors

Lethe’s Artwork

Japan’s Underwater City of the Sea Gods


The gringa’s dear readers may find musings of the lost city of Atlantis as fascinating as the gringa. What if it has actually been discovered off the coast of Japan? Hey, stranger things have happened! Although it is more likely that it is a lost city from Japan’s ancient Jomon civilization, sunk into the ocean thousands of years ago after a cataclysmic earthquake, tsunami or climate upheaval after the last ice age, it is still fun to entertain fantastical theories as well as explore the real science behind this archaeological mystery.

Originally discovered by dive instructor Kihachiro Aratake in 1986, these amazing formations have come to be known as the Yonaguni Monument. This massive underwater complex, dated to have hailed around 8000BC, can be found off the coastline of the island Yonaguni which is part of Japan’s Ryukyu island chain. Extending over an area of almost 1000 feet x 500 feet, the complex consists of ten structures, some appearing to be in the shape of animals as well as to contain glyphs of human characters and animals. Roads and retaining walls can be seen connecting the structure in the pattern of a well designed city.

For decades scuba diving tourists, as well as scuba diving archaeologists, have explored ancient ruins of a castle, majestic archway, five temples, a step pyramid and a massive arena. As the gringa only gets to explore pictures of the ruins, it is still pretty obvious even to my untrained eye that these are man-made. Yet there are still scientists who prefer to believe these are natural formations that were enhanced by ancient people into functional structures. This really aggravates the gringa when scientists wave aside the obvious because they just don’t want to admit that ancient civilizations may have been far more advanced than modern “experts” have traditionally been taught to believe.

Just as the west has Aesop’s fables, Japanese culture has their own popular fables, myths and legends. The Mu civilization is a fabled Pacific people. The ancient tale explains that they disappeared under the waves of the sea. In 1996 Masaaki Kimura, professor of marine geology from Japan’s University of the Ryukyus, began his own research to see if this is the long lost home of the Mu. He, too, was of the belief that Yonaguni was most likely a man-manipulated complex of natural formations. However, he was completely converted after his first dive.

Kimura identified quarry marks on many of the megalithic stones. And, since nature does not normally lay out large stones in symmetrical patterns and create many stones with right angles, the gringa tends to agree with Kimura’s conclusion. He studied carvings that were distinctly human faces and animals. The style was clearly indicative of Asian art. He refers to Egypt’s famous sphinx as he described one underwater sculpture of what seems to be a king. A glyph resembling a horse and a painted relief resembling a cow are still discernible making it apparent that this was not a city of mermaids and mermen living under the sea but was actually a thriving, above-ground metropolis at one time.

This area of the Pacific is famous for earthquakes and tsunamis. In the spring of 1771 the largest tsunami ever recorded struck Yonaguni. With a height of well over 130 feet, a catastrophic oceanic wave such as this would have been powerful enough to blast this ancient city well below the surface of the Pacific. Also, 10,000 years ago the sea level would have been more than 100 feet lower than it is today. The geographical area that the Yonaguni complex sits on would, at the time of its existence, have been well above the sea and on dry ground, a coastal city. A land bridge would have also existed connecting the chain of islands with the mainland making it entirely possible for humans to settle there with their domesticated animals.

Although some experts date the ruins to be about 10,000 years old, Kimura’s estimate gives the complex a much younger age. He suspects it may be a 5,000 year old civilization. Either way, this still places the city’s existence during the time of the Jomon civilization. Evidence to be more specific about the age of the structures is hard to come by. Existing beneath the ocean means that things like pottery or wooden objects have long since decayed and disappeared forever. There is, however, the chance of analysis of the paint used on the cow to get a bit more specific at pinning down a particular century.

Jomon culture during the timeframe considered for these structures can be divided into two separate eras:

  • Incipient Jomon (10,500-8000BC)
  • Initial Jomon (8000-5000BC)

Incipient Jomon civilization has left behind archaeological remains that indicate that the Jomon people were primarily hunter gatherers who produced pottery identified by their pointed bottoms and corded markings.  The following period, Initial Jomon, was noted by rising sea levels and global temperatures. The land bridge between the islands and the mainland would have disappeared. Diet would have transitioned to primarily sea based fare and the development of agriculture and farm production animals since natural resources were limited on the island. Large refuse mounds consisting of large amounts of shells discovered on archeological digs on the islands  attests to this. Remains of stone religious figurines and tools such as knives and axes have also been discovered in island digs and dated to the same period as the underwater city.

Historians describe the culture of the Jomon era to be very complex and in the early stages of organized agricultural develpment. Similarities with Asia’s ancient northeastern cultures as well as the ancient indigenous peoples of the Americas can be detected in many of the artifacts discovered. The Jomon preferred to live in coastal or river communities in homes that were sunken into the earth. Ironic, then, that one of their greatest cities eventually sunk into the ocean.

Although the gringa is unable to scuba dive because of epilepsy, I am certain that at least a few dear readers could join the many tourist divers and send me pictures and a recount of your adventure. During winter months, shark enthusiasts sink beneath the waves to observe the hammerheads that frequent the area.  However, if sharks aren’t your thing, and you prefer the mystery of history, you can always take a detour to the ruins and share your thrills here on the gringa’s blog.

Since the late 90s the underwater city has become increasingly popular among tourists. Famous writers and photographers have braved the waves to record their own bit of history. The Discovery Channel and National Geographic have performed their own expeditions. So, if any dear reader does get the opportunity for a dive of their own, you must drop the gringa a line here and share your own exciting story.

Sources:

National Geographic

www.mic.com

www.news.com.au

Hidden Archaeology

www.yonaguni.ws

www.britannica.com

www.metmuseum.org

Wikipedia

Image source: Source: Hidden Archeology

 

 

 

Rub A Dub, Dub, Nelson Needs A Tub


It’s pretty common for researchers and common man to first think about the coastal dwellers who will be displaced by rising ocean levels due to climate change. Thoughts also quickly turn to coastal species of plants and animals that may fare even worse, having nowhere to turn, and thus possibly becoming extinct.

One thing that is rarely considered are national treasures that sit seaside or within a harbor. What will happen to the likes of the Statue of Liberty or Nelson’s Column? What of the Doe and Stag columns that welcome sailors into safe harbor at the island of Rhodes? How many wonderful works of art will possibly be swallowed up by the seas and lost to landlubbers because of climate change?

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Statue of Liberty, USA, image source:  www.pamojasisi.blogspot.com

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The Doe and Stag, Rhodes, image source: http://www.superstock.co.uk

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Unconditional Surrender, San Diego, CA, USA, image source:  www.yelp.com

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Annie Moore (first registered Ellis Island immigrant), Cobh, County Cork, Ireland, image source:  www.friendlysonsofpatrick.org

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The Little Mermaid, Copenhagen, Denmark, image source: http://www.thousandwonders.net

And these are only a few that the gringa was able to search for and find. There are very few land-locked nations. Every country with a coastline has something to lose. We all have some artistic skin in the game. Beautiful, historic works of art are destined for watery graves, sooner or later, because of climate change. There may be a few heads bobbing above the waves but most of them will be forgotten by future generations except for adventurous scuba divers on photo safari.

Experts indicate that fossil fuel pollution accelerated climate change will continue to affect our planet even if we switched tomorrow to alternatives. We have passed the tipping point. It’s possible we have caused enough damage to affect significant change for the next 100,000 years. Over that period of time, as global temperatures continue to rise, sea levels will, too. Possibly as much as fifty meters (150 feet).

That means that timeless works of art that look out upon the seas and oceans of this world will definitely be inundated to oblivion. But to understand the true scope of the course our lifestyles have plotted for our planet, consider Nelson’s Column which is located well inland, at Trafalgar Square in London. Models of climate change predict that by the time this cycle has run its course, only half of the column will be visible above the water line.

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Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square, London, UK, image source: http://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com

Before these dramatic events reach their fulfillment, mankind will have undergone dramatic migrational upheavals. As much as one fifth of the world’s population is expected to be affected. Rough estimates put current world population at about seven billion. That means that about one billion and four hundred million (1,400,000,000) people are going to have to move.

Dear readers, consider the strain Europe is undergoing right now with a Syrian refugee migration.  The United Nations reports that over nine million Syrians have fled their homes since the civil war began years ago. Estimates put the numbers spilling into Europe at about one million, but those numbers are questionable. Imagine if the refugee numbers Europe had absorbed had been one thousand fold. That’s the kind of numbers scientists are talking about where climate change migration is concerned.

There is no technology available to build any seawall adequate to protect the populations of coastal cities. They will have to relocate. Eventually. Period. There is no going back. The best we can hope for is that if we start tomorrow with zero carbon emissions we might be able to spare future generations from a worst case scenario (as if).

And, since that’s not going to happen, the gringa says invest in some scuba gear, sturdy suitcases, and quality maps of inland locales if you are a coastal dweller. If you live on secure high ground, perhaps you should build a guest house or two, or three, or maybe even forty. It may be the humble beginnings of a future hotel and housing empire for your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandchildren.

 

Source:  www.uk.news.yahoo.com

 

Image Source: www.news.yahoo.com