Sparky & Boot, The Greatest Heroes of All Time


Although the gringa doesn’t often write about dogs, there is, indeed, a very soft space in my heart for them. In fact, I love them with all of my heart. I think dogs are just grand. In fact, in my own life I consider a dog named Sparky to be a hero. Alone on a rural farm with my oldest son who was about 5 years old at the time, Sparky took a bullet while keeping out an intruder. The gringa’s dear readers can only imagine how that dog lived a life fit for a king the rest of his days, even if he was left with one paw that resembled a flipper as a result of his wounds.

That being said, and after the gringa regained her composure and was able to type once again, I am moved to share the story of Boot.  He was the only retriever in a company of twenty military service dogs comprised of German Shepherds and Dobermans. Serving aboard an attack boat, he landed on the shores of enemy territory in Japan during World War II.

Trained at Camp Pendleton in California, Boot was actually the pet of a Sergeant and soon earned a reputation as playful, friendly and a bit of a character. When the ship was asea, the War Dogs were housed in kennels. Boot, however, got special privileges as a pet. He enjoyed more freedom as an on-board mascot and liked to cruise the decks, sneaking up behind unsuspecting sailors and grabbing their arms from off the railings. When forces landed at Iwo Jima, Boot was part of the invasion force and his later unexpected performance in battle made headlines in local papers.

The story goes that a Lieutenant arrived at camp and requested a War Dog to flush out some enemies forces who were hiding out in nearby caves. The Sergeant explained that all the War Dogs were currently out on duty and he would have to wait until their return. Noticing Boot, the Lieutenant asked why he could not be deployed. The Sergeant explained that, despite the fact that he had been fully trained as a War Dog, he was actually a pet, the troop’s mascot, but, since he knew all the battle commands, the Lieutenant could take him and give it a shot. The Lieutenant did just that and Boot was successful at clearing out three caves that were being held by enemy forces.

Because of Boot’s heroic actions, U.S. Marines were able to advance their battle line. Once Boot returned home, his fame followed him. He and his Sergeant made a guest appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show.

The nation’s very first Marine War Dog Training School was at Quantico Bay. It opened in January, 1943 under the command of Captain Samuel T. Brick. Fourteen Doberman Pinschers and a single Boxer were the first recruits. The Boxer, named Fritz, was the first dog sworn in as part of the Marine Corp. By the time Boot joined the Marine Corp, the United States had several War Dog training camps, including the one he attended at California’s Camp Pendleton.

When training began, War Dog recruits were ranked as Privates. Within three months successful recruits became Private First Class. Corporal rank was achieved at one year, Sergeant at two years and Platoon Sergeant at three years. Four year War Dog veterans became Gunner Sergeants and one year later they promoted to Master Gunner Sergeant. It was not uncommon for a War Dog to have a higher rank than their handler who might be fresh out of boot camp.

As the gringa envisions Boot fearlessly chasing the enemies in the close confines of the caves, she is taken back in her memory to the day Sparky took a bullet. He started out as a stray taken in as a pup. The gringa can’t count the number of times he tore up the fence and caused any number of problems. At one time the man of the house became so frustrated that he ordered the gringa to “take that dog to the pound”. The gringa obediently loaded Sparky up into the car the next day, drove to the pound, read the documents that required a signature releasing the dog for euthanasia in the event an adoption never happened, then burst into tears and loaded that darn dog back into the car and returned home.

When the man of the house returned and growled, “I thought I told you to take that dog to the pound.” The gringa calmly replied, “I did. You didn’t say anything about leaving him there.” And that was that. Although one would have never known from all the trouble he caused as a one year old spunky pup, that darn dog grew up to become the most amazing dog the gringa has ever known.

We lived on a farm and had loads of chickens. That came about because the gringa had the bright idea of becoming a chicken farmer. What wasn’t expected was that when it came time to sell hens to become roasters on family tables or roosters that might end up in a soup pot or illicit cockfighting ring, the gringa could not bear to destine the little creatures to such a fate. So, the chicken farm became an egg farm and rooster bachelor haven. It also became the hub for local chicken hawks looking to score an easy meal.

Although Sparky had no training whatsoever, it did not take him long to realize that the chickens were part of the family and he became their self-appointed protector. He would go bananas barking and lunging upward as far as he could, threatening chicken hawks that seemed to be miles away in the sky. If the chickens got too spread out as they foraged, he would herd them closer to the barn where they could skedaddle to safety if a chicken hawk showed up.

Sparky wasn’t our only dog on the farm. Living out in the country meant that it was not uncommon for people to dump an unwanted dog, expecting it to somehow revert to its wild nature and survive alone. We also had Dot, a dumped deaf Dalmatian, Trixie, a golden chow the man of the house found as a homeless golden puffball that the gringa relentlessly shaved down to the skin all year round, and Scooby, a fat black retriever looking thing who revealed an amazing rapid weight loss overnight which caused us to realize that she was only fat because she was pregnant. So then we had 6 more dogs on our hands, which we eventually found homes for.

Out of all of these dogs who had a grand farm dog life, Sparky was the only one who exhibited remarkable intelligence. The others were all fine dogs in their own respects but there is no doubt that Sparky alone stood out as a hero.

For instance, there was the day a neighbor moved in about 5 acres over. She was a single woman who, the gringa believes, must have had a very tragic story. She was not just reclusive but obsessed with security. She installed an electrified security fence that was 8-10’ tall around her house. If that weren’t enough she put in a small shooting range and was outside all the time practicing her marksmanship with her pistols. Then she got some dogs. And not just any dogs.

You see, we lived on the flatland prairie north of Dallas at that time. A person could step outside and practically see for miles. And sound carried even further. It didn’t take too many trips to the barn before the gringa witnessed the new neighbor outside her secure perimeter with four full-grown German Shepherds and a professional handler in a protective suit training the dogs to attack. I tell ya, the gringa went from thinking she had a recovering victim next door to considering a full-fledged, dangerous lunatic was near at hand.

After weeks of training, the handler no longer came. The neighbor, however, continued to take the dogs outside the security fence and work with them on the open prairie. Her confidence in controlling them was misplaced.

One day, while I was outside working and our oldest son was doing his thing on the swingset, the gringa could hear the whistles and commands that indicated the nut next door was working with her dogs. Soon her tone of voice changed. The gringa heard crazy barking and turned to see her pack of attack dogs high-tailing it across the fields, making a bee-line for me and mine. I threw down my feed buckets, ran and scooped up my son, threw him through the back door of the house then hoped I had time to lock the gate on the pen to the barn where my donkeys were happily munching away on some fresh hay I had just laid out. I gave the chickens up for dead and started calling the dogs to me.

I locked up the pen and headed back for the house eyeing the distance that was quickly closing between me and the German Shepherds. I realized I had to make a decision. I might not even have time to make it into the house myself, there was no way to even attempt penning up my dogs. All of them were outside dogs, housed in the barn at night and during bad weather. These unmannered barn dogs were all going to have to go in the house with me. I didn’t care and they were more than happy to follow and see what the mystery was all about in this one structure they had never been allowed to explore.

As I turned to close and lock the patio door, seeing the German Shepherds lunge through the gap between barbed wire strands of our fence I realized that Sparky was still out on the deck barking like a maniac at the intruders. I called and called but he ignored me and stood his ground. In the midst of the chaos and fear it took some time before I realized that his refusal to obey me was because, in the confusion, Trixie, still quite young, had run under the deck instead of into the house. I could see her trembling in the gaps between the wooden steps. He was protecting her. Crap. Now what does the gringa do?

The gringa instructs her 5-year-old son to man the back door. The gringa runs to the front door on the other side of the house, slips out and under the porch, belly crawls under the house, grabs Trixie, crawls back to the front, puppy in tow, still listening to the ruckus Sparky is making, hoping he survives but grateful for the distraction so I can safely rescue Trixie. By now I can hear the shouts from my neighbor who has obviously been making her way across the pasture to get her crazed dog pack.

I get back in the house, dump Trixie and load my shotgun with birdshot. I get my son out of the way who has been cheering Sparky but then suddenly becomes very serious when he sees his dirty, cobweb covered mother with an enormous gun in her hand (and most likely a very mean, murderous gleam in her eye).

I walk out beside Sparky and yell at the dogs to get. They go bananas, even crazier, and the gringa is pretty sure that she has just poured gasoline onto a fire. I don’t dare touch Sparky and try to drag him in the house. He is so pissed he might just bite me. The German Shepherds are not listening to their master as she uses her stupid dog whistle from the other side of the fence. Finally, the gringa makes her most critical decision. I maneuver over to the side of the deck slowly and land a blast of birdshot on the behind of the dog in the most unfortunate position of the outside of the pack. I never in my life thought a dog could jump straight up like a cat. However, when they are shot with birdshot in the backside, they do.

For a split second everything was quiet. We were all in shock. It was like the dogs were saying, “Did she just shoot one of us?” And Sparky was thinking, “What should I do next?” And then it was all chaos again. The neighbor lady was about to stroke out in her madness that I had just shot one of her dogs, not realizing it was only a flesh wound. One of her dogs was wailing in pain, the others were circling the deck, eyeing the steps as they prepared to rip me apart, and the gringa took advantage of Sparky’s momentary lapse back into reason to grab his collar and back up to the door. Thankfully my son was still performing his door duty because it promptly opened when my own backside struck it.

When the man of the house returned home from work, true to 5-year-old form, our son streaked right out the door and before his father could set one foot out of his truck, he promptly tattled on his mother and said, “Mom shot the neighbor’s dog today.”

And who knows, Sparky’s future injury may have very well been payback. The gringa will never know. All she does know is that it was afternoon naptime for her and a very grubby 6-year-old boy about six months after the gringa shot the neighbor’s dog. We had been sound asleep for about one hour when there came a strange, repeating pound on the front door accompanied by whines and yips. Dog sounds, yes, but not the usual dog sounds our little pack made.

I went to the front door and found Scooby and Dot jumping up on the door and the side of the house in distress. Scooby, like a retriever, took my hand in her mouth and tugged. Dot just made circles and strange yipping sounds. I followed, puzzled. They led me to the front gate of our driveway that was about the length of a football field. It couldn’t be seen from the house because of a cluster of trees that surrounded a small watering hole directly in front of the house. When I got to the gate there sat Sparky, shivering in pain and shock as Trixie comforted him by licking his wounded paw that would become a flipper after removing all the pieces of shattered bone in order to avoid amputating the whole darn leg.

I rushed Sparky to the vet not knowing exactly what had happened. I wouldn’t learn the truth until I talked to our other neighbor. He was a horse trainer and almost always outside working on his property which was across the road from me. He only noticed what happened after he heard the shot. He saw a person, too far away for any other details, running down the road and eventually out of sight. By the time he had put up his horses and come over to check on us we were already at the vet’s office. He said he saw the enormous cloud of dust I left behind as I drove like a  bat out of you know where.

When the vet found out that Sparky had been injured in the line of duty, he was very impressed. He knew that saving Sparky was going to be very expensive and that the gringa was not made of money. He offered to save Sparky for free if I would let him keep my hero dog. The gringa said no thank you, that a certain little boy would never forgive me for such a betrayal, and chose to max out a credit card instead.

Despite my own notoriety with a shotgun, it was really Sparky’s fame that ended up stretching far and wide throughout the local high school. When he reached the end of his days at 17-years-old and the appointment was made with the veterinarian to ease his passing, for three days high school students that were classmates and friends with our children made their way over for one last visit with Sparky. You see, since our kids were school age, Sparky faithfully made the morning and afternoon pick-up and drop-off trips to the school. Often he was hanging out the window, mooching a scratch from any passerby. Everyone knew Sparky, the dog with a limping flipper who was a hero. And now the gringa is crying again.

Sources:

www.uswardogs.org

k9history.com

 

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Drones, UFOs, and Saving The Planet… They Are ALL Connected


UFO enthusiasts got a thrill recently when news agencies all over the United States were sounding the alarm of a strange light seen hovering, then moving about, near the famous St. Louis Arch. The YouTube video posted below, sourced from streetview citycams, begins by speeding up the video 1000 times so as not to bore the viewer with several minutes of nothingness. Throughout the hi-speed progression lightning can be observed. As viewers watch, they can see the light dim and sometimes disappear because of cloud cover. The video records a strange light approach the Arch from the left side of the screen and do some interesting acrobatics. The gringa has provided a play by play script to refer to as the dear reader views the video.

Video begins 2:19:49 streetcam time (SCT)/0:00 YouTube Time (YTT).

2:25:13 SCT/0:15 YTT First arrow indicates the appearance of the light in the top middle portion of the screen with light becoming visible at 2:25:19 SCT/0:17 YTT and approaches the Arch.

2:26:20 SCT/0:39 YTT Light appears to hover over the Arch, “wink out” a couple of times only to reappear in relatively the same place, indicating it was hovering the entire time.

2:26:41 SCT/0:46 YTT Light winks out.

2:28:06 SCT/0:52 YTT Light reappears as indicated by arrow and seems to be in same position above the Arch which would make it seem that it was hovering the entire time it was not visible.

2:28:54 SCT/0:56 YTT Light appears to be hovering above the Arch.

2:29:36 SCT/1:00 YTT Light winks out.

2:30:01 SCT/1:02 YTT Arrow directs attention to higher point above the Arch, indicating that the light has climbed higher. However, it is not visible.

2:31:00 SCT/1:08 YTT Another arrow indicates the light to be in the upper left corner of the screen but the gringa does not see it appear.

2:31:18 SCT/1:14 YTT The gringa begins to click through each second at the rate of 2 clicks per second so I get to see half of a second in each frame. I see a flash of the light at a higher point above the arch as I begin my second click of 1:15 YTT, going into my first click of 1:16 YTT. There is no arrow used in the video here to direct you to the flash of light. If you are not prepared you will miss it.

2:32:08 SCT/1:22 YTT Arrow again indicates that the light is seemingly flashing in the top left corner of the screen. Then there is a clear winking on and off of a light in the far left top corner of the screen as the light begins a rapid descent, disappearing behind cloud cover, but can clearly be seen descending.

2:32:25 SCT/1:28 YTT The arrow draws the viewer’s attention to the light whose rapid descent has been abruptly arrested and it once again begins to hover.

2:32:39 SCT/1:33 YTT Light brightly blinks out after a short rapid descent. If you begin once again to click through frames, 2 clicks per second/frame, the light can be seen faintly descending, angling off to the left, then hooking sharply right and descending quickly and can be viewed practically all the way to its landing on the ground in the lower left portion of the screen, its final landing at about 2:32:47 SCT/1:36 YTT.

Summary of the mystery light’s activity:

  • About 45 seconds of hovering above the Arch.
  • For about 1 minute the light continues to climb and hover above the Arch.
  • Within about 50 seconds the light manages to travel the distance in the view screen from seeming to hover above the Arch to the upper left corner of the view screen.
  • Within 30 seconds light makes a rapid descent that includes a brief hover before two radical left/right maneuvers, like a zig-zag, and appears to land on the ground.

So what was it? The gringa believes it was a drone, not an extra-terrestrial vehicle. It is pretty obvious by the final descent and apparent landing on the ground that it is a very small vehicle and very much Earthling technology. The gringa doesn’t know all the details on speed and distance relative to the camera and the Arch, but that doesn’t change my mind that it is a drone. And the gringa warns her dear readers to be on the lookout for many more videos and hoaxes to come with drone technology becoming more and more affordable for technology enthusiasts.

Other than making interesting UFO hoax videos, what are some actual practical uses for drones? Well, for one thing, drones may very well help save the world, and the gringa’s not talking about how military personnel are already putting them to use in battle. Using them to target and kill fellow human beings is not the gringa’s idea of saving the world.

Using them as a research tool to monitor dolphin and whale populations is more what the gringa considers saving the world. And that is just what marine biologists are doing in Hawai’i. Ocean Alliance is taking advantage of how drones can monitor wildlife without intrusion by humans. With drones capable of being equipped with high resolution cameras, researchers can get close up views and real time video of what dolphin pods and whale families are doing. Even if weather is bad and ocean conditions rough, the drones can still go out and do their job when a human outing would otherwise get postponed.

Drone technology has allowed researchers to compile a more accurate catalog of whale groups and monitor their health conditions with more detailed analysis. Results from boat-based surveys simply do not compare and marine biologists are excited to go even further with drones.

Now, while some people may be excited at the thought of drones delivering pizza or their mail order of retail goods, the gringa is more excited about drone delivery of medicine to hard to reach vulnerable people around the world.

With successful deliveries to earthquake ravaged Haiti in 2012, Doctors Without Borders were inspired to test drone delivery of  a group of dummy TB test samples in remote villages in Papua New Guinea. The Mayo Clinic recently announced that drone medical delivery is poised to take off and revolutionize healthcare for people around the world where access has continued to be a problem.

So what might be the niche technology career of the future for our youth interested in STEM? Development of drone technology and drone piloting. So, don’t get left behind! Get on board to save the world with a joy-stick, a laptop and a map! That’s all you need today to be a superhero!

Sources:

www.whale.org

www.yahoo.com

www.mayoclinic.org

Image Credit: 1.bp.blogspot.com

A Eureka Moment


The gringa thinks one of the coolest places to be would be sitting next to a scientist when a new discovery is made. Despite cartoons and caricatures that use the word, “Eureka!” the gringa thinks it’s more likely that a scientist would exclaim, “What the heck is that?!” And that seems to be exactly the case with some marine biologists who were observing the mysterious depths of the Pacific Ocean.

Using a robotic camera to explore the sea surrounding the Channel Islands off California’s coastline an unusual purple orb came into view and one scientist proclaimed, “I’m stumped!” Watch below and experience what it’s like to be a scientist who has no idea what it is that you have just discovered:

After successfully retrieving the mystery blob with a robotic arm using a remote suction device, the researchers brought the blob on board their vessel for further research. However, they are still at a loss as to what it is. Here are a couple of ideas of what it could possibly be:

Giant Japanese Spider Crab Egg Sac

Giant Japanese spider crabs have eight extremely long legs that can span 10-12 feet from the tip of one leg to the tip of the opposing one. Although its legs are enormous, its body is barely over one foot in diameter. Its scientific name, Macrocheira kampfaeri, uses the Greek “makros” (big/long) and “cheir” (hands/arms). Seems completely appropriate. In Japanese, if the gringa saw one of these, she would scream, “AAARGH! TAKA-ASHI-GANI!!!!”. No, that’ not Japanese for “scariest sea monster ever”. It means “tall legs crab”. With all that body armor a giant Japanese spider crab can weigh almost 45 pounds. For seafood lovers, don’t get excited. There’s really not much there to make a meal off of, most of the weight being the exoskeleton.

To see one up close you can visit a few aquariums that house their own crabby celebrities:

As these crabs grow and mature they regularly shed their exoskeletons just like how a snake sheds its skin. The wriggle around until the shell splits then back out of it. Watch the video below to see a giant Japanese spider crab go through the molting process:

As my dear readers can see in the above video giant Japanese spider crabs like to eat smaller crabs as well as shrimp, dead fish and even plants and algae. They’ll eat just about anything. They can live about 50-100 years. During that time they can also have lots of giant Japanese spider crab babies.

When these crabs get frisky they go very deep, probably as a means to provide a safer place for their eggs. Now, since crab experts know that the mom carries her eggs around until they hatch, the gringa suspects the scientists that saw the purple blob and thought it could possibly be a spider crab egg sac were just so excited that they spoke before they thought. Especially since there were spider crabs skittering around all over the place and one seeming to be a bit protective when the camera got a bit too close.

Pleurobranch

So, ruling out the giant Japanese spider crab egg sac as a possibility, the scientists also wonder if it might be a member of the pleurobranch family, or, to put it simply, a sea slug or sea cucumber. Sea slugs come in all shapes, sizes, colors and crazy imitations of surrounding oceanic critters and “stuff”. Take a look at the images below:

sea_slug6

So, considering how crazy the above sea slugs look, it’s quite possible the purple blob is a cousin.

So, for now, the purple blob remains a mystery and most definitely not a spider crab egg sac but maybe a sea slug (or an extra terrestrial for all you science fiction fans!).

Source:

ipfactly.com

Image Sources:

canadajournal.net

a-z-animals.com

Jens Petersen, Dino Sassi, Marcel Fayon, Mehrdad

Japan’s Underwater City of the Sea Gods


The gringa’s dear readers may find musings of the lost city of Atlantis as fascinating as the gringa. What if it has actually been discovered off the coast of Japan? Hey, stranger things have happened! Although it is more likely that it is a lost city from Japan’s ancient Jomon civilization, sunk into the ocean thousands of years ago after a cataclysmic earthquake, tsunami or climate upheaval after the last ice age, it is still fun to entertain fantastical theories as well as explore the real science behind this archaeological mystery.

Originally discovered by dive instructor Kihachiro Aratake in 1986, these amazing formations have come to be known as the Yonaguni Monument. This massive underwater complex, dated to have hailed around 8000BC, can be found off the coastline of the island Yonaguni which is part of Japan’s Ryukyu island chain. Extending over an area of almost 1000 feet x 500 feet, the complex consists of ten structures, some appearing to be in the shape of animals as well as to contain glyphs of human characters and animals. Roads and retaining walls can be seen connecting the structure in the pattern of a well designed city.

For decades scuba diving tourists, as well as scuba diving archaeologists, have explored ancient ruins of a castle, majestic archway, five temples, a step pyramid and a massive arena. As the gringa only gets to explore pictures of the ruins, it is still pretty obvious even to my untrained eye that these are man-made. Yet there are still scientists who prefer to believe these are natural formations that were enhanced by ancient people into functional structures. This really aggravates the gringa when scientists wave aside the obvious because they just don’t want to admit that ancient civilizations may have been far more advanced than modern “experts” have traditionally been taught to believe.

Just as the west has Aesop’s fables, Japanese culture has their own popular fables, myths and legends. The Mu civilization is a fabled Pacific people. The ancient tale explains that they disappeared under the waves of the sea. In 1996 Masaaki Kimura, professor of marine geology from Japan’s University of the Ryukyus, began his own research to see if this is the long lost home of the Mu. He, too, was of the belief that Yonaguni was most likely a man-manipulated complex of natural formations. However, he was completely converted after his first dive.

Kimura identified quarry marks on many of the megalithic stones. And, since nature does not normally lay out large stones in symmetrical patterns and create many stones with right angles, the gringa tends to agree with Kimura’s conclusion. He studied carvings that were distinctly human faces and animals. The style was clearly indicative of Asian art. He refers to Egypt’s famous sphinx as he described one underwater sculpture of what seems to be a king. A glyph resembling a horse and a painted relief resembling a cow are still discernible making it apparent that this was not a city of mermaids and mermen living under the sea but was actually a thriving, above-ground metropolis at one time.

This area of the Pacific is famous for earthquakes and tsunamis. In the spring of 1771 the largest tsunami ever recorded struck Yonaguni. With a height of well over 130 feet, a catastrophic oceanic wave such as this would have been powerful enough to blast this ancient city well below the surface of the Pacific. Also, 10,000 years ago the sea level would have been more than 100 feet lower than it is today. The geographical area that the Yonaguni complex sits on would, at the time of its existence, have been well above the sea and on dry ground, a coastal city. A land bridge would have also existed connecting the chain of islands with the mainland making it entirely possible for humans to settle there with their domesticated animals.

Although some experts date the ruins to be about 10,000 years old, Kimura’s estimate gives the complex a much younger age. He suspects it may be a 5,000 year old civilization. Either way, this still places the city’s existence during the time of the Jomon civilization. Evidence to be more specific about the age of the structures is hard to come by. Existing beneath the ocean means that things like pottery or wooden objects have long since decayed and disappeared forever. There is, however, the chance of analysis of the paint used on the cow to get a bit more specific at pinning down a particular century.

Jomon culture during the timeframe considered for these structures can be divided into two separate eras:

  • Incipient Jomon (10,500-8000BC)
  • Initial Jomon (8000-5000BC)

Incipient Jomon civilization has left behind archaeological remains that indicate that the Jomon people were primarily hunter gatherers who produced pottery identified by their pointed bottoms and corded markings.  The following period, Initial Jomon, was noted by rising sea levels and global temperatures. The land bridge between the islands and the mainland would have disappeared. Diet would have transitioned to primarily sea based fare and the development of agriculture and farm production animals since natural resources were limited on the island. Large refuse mounds consisting of large amounts of shells discovered on archeological digs on the islands  attests to this. Remains of stone religious figurines and tools such as knives and axes have also been discovered in island digs and dated to the same period as the underwater city.

Historians describe the culture of the Jomon era to be very complex and in the early stages of organized agricultural develpment. Similarities with Asia’s ancient northeastern cultures as well as the ancient indigenous peoples of the Americas can be detected in many of the artifacts discovered. The Jomon preferred to live in coastal or river communities in homes that were sunken into the earth. Ironic, then, that one of their greatest cities eventually sunk into the ocean.

Although the gringa is unable to scuba dive because of epilepsy, I am certain that at least a few dear readers could join the many tourist divers and send me pictures and a recount of your adventure. During winter months, shark enthusiasts sink beneath the waves to observe the hammerheads that frequent the area.  However, if sharks aren’t your thing, and you prefer the mystery of history, you can always take a detour to the ruins and share your thrills here on the gringa’s blog.

Since the late 90s the underwater city has become increasingly popular among tourists. Famous writers and photographers have braved the waves to record their own bit of history. The Discovery Channel and National Geographic have performed their own expeditions. So, if any dear reader does get the opportunity for a dive of their own, you must drop the gringa a line here and share your own exciting story.

Sources:

National Geographic

www.mic.com

www.news.com.au

Hidden Archaeology

www.yonaguni.ws

www.britannica.com

www.metmuseum.org

Wikipedia

Image source: Source: Hidden Archeology

 

 

 

Hercules & Plankton


Most of the time when the name NASA pops up images of stars and far flung planets and rocket ships come to mind. We often forget that NASA is interested in studying life on ALL planets, including our own. Yesterday, November 12, NASA officially launched their airborne laboratory on a C-130H Hercules. It headed north to St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada to begin its earthbound mission “North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study” (NAMES). The Hercules was accompanied by sea by the research ship “Atlantis” that is operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Together, these two research vessels will study the yearly cycle of phytoplankton and the effect small airborne particles produced by the ocean have on the North Atlantic’s fragile climate. Data will be collected throughout early December. This location has been chosen to study because this is the where the Earth’s largest phytoplankton bloom occurs each year.

The organic compounds the bloom releases can be detected as far away as the waters surrounding Ireland. By studying the plankton’s ecological and biological processes year after year, the ocean’s health and biology can be documented and the relationship between the ocean and its gaseous exchange with the air, which in turn influences clouds and climate, can be better understood.

The Atlantis is in for a four week cruise on the Atlantic Ocean where it will routinely rendezvous with the Hercules so that the two laboratories can coordinate and share computer models, satellite data, and the input of all of the scientists on board each vessel.  They hope that their efforts will help improve readiness and response to the changes predicted to occur in Earth’s ecosystems due to aerosol changes within our world’s warming ocean.

Plankton, one of the smallest organisms on Earth, are, ironically, strongly connected with climate change. Plankton is the first stage of the ocean’s food chain. Changes there create a chain reaction that affects everything else in the world. At present, there are conflicting scientific theories as to the details of how plankton’s aerosol emissions create changes. One goal of these missions are to coalesce the arguments into one sound approach.

NASA is committed to leadership in tackling the serious environmental issues that affect the entire world today. NASA makes the gringa’s little heart swell with pride by freely sharing their knowledge with institutions worldwide. In fact, over twenty different research and academic facilities are involved in the research operations of this mission. NASA doesn’t just see the earth as interconnected environmentally, it also understands the interconnectedness of humanity. That’s one reason the gringa is their biggest cheerleader.

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part VIII, T-Z


In conclusion of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, this completes the listing of the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

06-APR-70   TAKAGI YUJIRO   CIV   Not on Official DIA list

02-Aug-69   TALKEN GEORGE FRANCIS   USN

19-Jun-64   TALLEY JAMES L.   ARMY   MIA in ground fight on patrol

23-Mar-66   TAPP JOHN B.   USN

10-Sep-66   TATUM LAWRENCE B.   USAF

18-May-65   TAVARES JOHN R.   CIV   Last seen at bar in Da Nang

28-Sep-66   TAYLOR DANNY G.   ARMY

08-May-72   TAYLOR EDMUND B. JR.   USN

13-Jul-65   TAYLOR FRED   ARMY   ARVN Air/Ground search neg

15-Feb-71   TAYLOR JAMES H.   ARMY

10-Mar-66   TAYLOR JAMES L.   ARMY

14-Sep-65   TAYLOR NEIL BROOKS   USN

15-Jul-71   TAYLOR TED J.   ARMY

06-Dec-70   TAYLOR WALTER J. JR.   ARMY

22-Jan-66   TEMPLIN ERWIN B. JR.   USN

09-Mar-70   TERLA LOTHAR G.   USAF

02-Oct-69   TERRELL KEAVIN L.   USN

31-Mar-71   TERRILL PHILIP B.   ARMY   Reported died in Tri Border area 04/71

03-May-68   TERRY ORAL R.   ARMY

29-Jan-66   TERRY RONALD T.   ARMY

13-Mar-67   TERWILLIGER VIRGIL BYRON   USMC

21-May-66   THACKERSON WALTER A.   ARMY

06-Jul-71   THOMAS DANIEL W.   USAF

14-Oct-66   THOMAS DARWIN JOEL   USN

29-Apr-75   THOMAS FERNANDO K.   CIV

03-Apr-68   THOMAS JAMES C.   USMC

25-Nov-71   THOMAS JAMES R.   USAF

25-Oct-68   THOMPSON BENJAMIN A.   ARMY   Lost in river

12-Aug-72   THOMPSON DAVID M.   USN

06-Feb-68   THOMPSON MELVIN C.   USN

01-Aug-68   THOMPSON WILLIAM J.   USAF

16-Jan-68   THOMPSON WILLIAM JOSEPH   USN

28-Jan-67   THORNTON WILLIAM D.   ARMY

29-Apr-75   THUY NHIEN TRIEU   CIV

15-Sep-66   TICE PAUL DOUGLAS   USMC

21-Mar-66   TIDERMAN JOHN M.   USN

21-Jul-66   TIFFIN RAINFORD   USAF

22-Aug-72   TIGNER LEE M.   USAF

05-SEP-63   TIK CHUI TO   CIV   Not on Official lists – (CIA) Air America

15-Nov-66   TIMMONS BRUCE ALLAN   USN

02-Jul-68   TIPPING HENRY ALBERT   USAF

26-Apr-68   TODD LARRY RICHARD   USAF

09-May-67   TODD ROBERT JACY   USMC

21-Nov-65   TOMS DENNIS L.   USN

27-Dec-71   TOWNLEY ROY F.   CIV

16-Sep-69   TRAMPSKI DONALD J.   ARMY

22-Mar-71   TRAVER JOHN G. III   ARMY

06-Feb-68   TRAVIS LYNN M.   USN

07-Oct-66   TREECE JAMES A.   USAF

13-May-70   TRENT ALAN R.   USAF   (Photo)

06-Apr-68   TRIMBLE JAMES M.   USMC

07-Jul-67   TRITT JAMES FRANCIS   USN   Lost overboard

04-Apr-68   TRIVELPIECE STEVE M.   ARMY   Reported KIA by gunfire, remains left behind

17-Apr-66   TROMP WILLIAM L.   USN

26-Dec-69   TROWBRIDGE DUSTIN C.   USN

26-Oct-71   TRUDEAU ALBERT R.   ARMY   4 remains found at crash site, not subjs

07-Jan-68   TRUJILLO ROBERT S.   ARMY

15-Jan-70   TUBBS GLENN E.   ARMY

26-Apr-66   TUCKER JAMES H.   USAF

24-Dec-71   TUCKER TIMOTHY M.   USAF

20-Jun-66   TUNNELL JOHN W.   USN

06-Nov-68   TURNER FREDERICK RAY   USMC

09-Oct-69   TURNER JAMES H.   ARMY

17-Sep-72   TUROSE MICHAEL STEPHEN   USAF   (Photo)

02-Oct-69   TYE MICHAEL J.   USN

24-Oct-68   TYLER GEORGE E.   USAF

11-Jun-67    UHLMANSIEK RALPH E.    ARMY

29-Apr-75    UNDERWOOD F.    CIV

21-Mar-70   UNDERWOOD THOMAS W.   USMC

05-Dec-65   UPNER EDWARD C.   ARMY   Reported KIA in ground combat, remains not recovered

28-May-71   URQUHART PAUL D.   ARMY

26-Jan-69   UTLEY RUSSEL K.   USAF

10-Dec-64    VADEN WOODROW W.    USAF   Remains possibly comingled with Viets

09-May-68    VAN ARTSDALEN CLIFFORD V.    ARMY

24-Jun-65   VAN CAMPEN THOMAS C.   ARMY   Wounded, became separated from unit

22-Apr-69    VAN CLEAVE WALTER SHELBY   USAF

02-Dec-69   VANDEN EYKEL MARTIN D. II   ARMY   Group burial with no positive Id

14-Oct-67   VAUGHAN ROBERT REDDINGTON   USN

02-Oct-69   VIADO REYNALDO R.   USN

30-May-62   VIETTI ELANOR A.   CIV   Taken from Leprosarium

11-May-66   VILLEPONTEAUX JAMES H. JR.   USMC

22-Nov-65   VISCONTI FRANCIS E.   USMC

05-MAY-70   VISOT MICHEL   CIV

01-Feb-66   VLAHAKOS PETER G.   USMC

18-Sep-65    VOGT LEONARD F. JR.   USN

27-Mar-72   WAGNER RAYMOND A.   USAF

31-MAY-70   WAKU YOSHIHIKO   CIV   Not on Official Lists

07-Apr-72   WALKER BRUCE C.   USAF   Reported evaded for 11 days, NVA approaching

02-Oct-64   WALKER KENNETH E.   USAF

31-Jan-67   WALKER LLOYD F.   USAF   No sign of subj

15-Jul-69   WALKER MICHAEL S.   USAF

13-Dec-68   WALKER SAMUEL F.   USAF   Mid air collision, parachute observed

07-Apr-66    WALKER THOMAS TAYLOR   USAF

20-Apr-68   WALKER WILLIAM J.   USMC

18-May-66   WALL JERRY M.   USAF

25-Jan-67   WALLACE ARNOLD B.   ARMY

28-Aug-67   WALLACE CHARLES FRANKLIN   USMC

19-Apr-68   WALLACE MICHAEL J.   ARMY

25-Apr-75   WALSH BRIAN   CIV   Led away at gunpoint by communists

15-Feb-69   WALSH RICHARD A.   USAF

10-May-69   WALTERS WILLIAM   ARMY

13-Jun-69  WARD NEAL CLINTON  USAF

18-Dec-72   WARD RONALD J.   USAF

04-Nov-69   WARE JOHN A.   ARMY

26-Oct-69   WARREN GARY D.   USAF   (Photo)

17-Jun-66   WASHBURN LARRY E.   USAF

08-Oct-69   WATKINS ROBERT J. JR.   ARMY

18-Jun-65   WATSON FRANK P.   USAF

13-Mar-68   WATSON JIMMY L.   ARMY

18-Feb-71   WATSON RONALD L.   ARMY   Reported KIA in crash, remains tagged but not recovered

18-Aug-71   WEAKS MELVIN L.   ARMY   

08-Nov-67   WEATHERMAN EARL C.   USMC   Reported died during escape 04/01/68

01-Nov-66   WEAVER GEORGE R. JR.   USN

22-Oct-65   WEGER JOHN JR.   USAF

22-Apr-66   WEIMORTS ROBERT F.   USN

10-Oct-69   WEISNER FRANKLIN L.   ARMY

27-Dec-71   WEISSENBACK EDWARD J.  CIV

12-Feb-67   WEISSMUELLER COURTNEY E.   USAF

23-Mar-61   WEITKAMP EDGAR WILKEN   ARMY

25-May-69   WEITZ MONEK   USMC

16-Jan-67   WELCH ROBERT J.  USAF

17-Aug-70   WELLONS PHILLIP ROGERSON   USAF

22-Jul-66   WELLS ROBERT J.   ARMY

07-Jan-69   WELSH LARRY D.   ARMY

03-Mar-68   WELSHAN JOHN T.   USAF

19-Apr-68   WERDEHOFF MICHAEL M.   ARMY

02-Jan-70   WEST JOHN T.   USAF

30-Mar-72   WESTCOTT GARY P.   ARMY

05-Oct-68   WESTER ALBERT D.   USAF

23-Mar-61   WESTON OSCAR B. JR.   USAF

17-May-70   WESTWOOD NORMAN P. JR.   USN

21-Apr-70   WHEELER EUGENE L.   USMC   Voice contact, in shootout

29-Jan-68   WHITE CHARLES E.   ARMY   Reported impaled

24-Nov-69   WHITE JAMES B.   USAF   (Photo)

02-Nov-69   WHITFORD LAWRENCE W. JR.   USAF

01-May-68   WHITMIRE WARREN T. JR.   ARMY

23-Mar-72   WHITT JAMES E.   USAF

27-Mar-68   WHITTEKER RICHARD LEE   USAF

11-Apr-68   WHITTEMORE FREDERICK H.   USN

24-Sep-66   WHITTLE JUNIOR L.   ARMY   Reported drowned while swimming

16-Dec-65   WICKHAM DAVID W. II   USN

12-May-68   WIDDISON IMLAY S.   ARMY

12-May-68   WIDNER DANNY L.   ARMY

16-Nov-68   WIECHERT ROBERT CHARLES   USAF

21-Jan-73   WIEHR RICHARD D.   USN   Reported overboard

07-Jun-70   WILBRECHT KURT MICHAEL   USMC

19-Apr-68   WILBURN JOHN E.   ARMY

06-May-72   WILES MARVIN B.   USN

12-Jun-72   WILEY RICHARD D.   ARMY

17-Jan-68   WILKE ROBERT F.   USAF

08-Feb-69   WILKINS CALVIN WAYNE   USMC

17-Apr-69   WILLETT ROBERT V. JR.   USAF

29-Apr-75   WILLIAMS DANNY MUY   CIV

03-Oct-66   WILLIAMS EDDIE L.   ARMY

03-Apr-72   WILLIAMS EDWARD W.   ARMY

25-May-69   WILLIAMS LEROY C.   USMC

11-May-72   WILLIAMS ROBERT J.   ARMY

12-May-68   WILLIAMS ROY C.   ARMY

21-Jul-68   WILLING EDWARD A.   USMC

26-Feb-66   WILLS FRANCIS D.   ARMY

04-Jun-70   WILSON HARRY TRUMAN   USMC

19-Oct-70   WILSON PETER J.   ARMY

14-Jun-71   WILSON RICHARD JR.   ARMY

02-Jul-67   WILSON WAYNE VASTER   USMC

22-Nov-65   WINKLER JOHN ANTHONY   USN

19-Jul-66   WINTERS DARRYL G.   USAF

21-Apr-67   WINTERS DAVID M.   ARMY   Disappeared while on Sampan

23-Dec-70   WISEMAN BAIN W. JR.   ARMY

09-May-65   WISTRAND ROBERT C.   USAF

16-Feb-69   WOGAN WILLIAM M.   ARMY

28-Jun-66   WOLFE THOMAS HUBERT   USAF

09-Aug-68   WOLFKEIL WAYNE B.   USAF

01-Mar-66   WOLOSZYK DONALD J.   USN

20-Oct-67   WOMACK LONNIE H.   USN   Listed AWOL, not heard of since 10/24/67

27-Mar-72   WONG EDWARD PUCK KOW   ARMY

16-Jan-66   WOOD DON C.   USAF   Positive Id in PL film (Photo)

06-Feb-67   WOOD PATRICK H.   USAF

02-Jun-67   WOOD REX S.   USN

02-May-66   WOOD WALTER S.   USN

02-Sep-72   WOOD WILLIAM C. JR.   USAF

03-Nov-70   WOODS DAVID W.   ARMY

18-Feb-71   WOODS GERALD E.   ARMY   KIA in crash, remains tagged, no recovery

17-Apr-65   WOODWORTH SAMUEL ALEXANDER   USAF

19-Oct-65   WORCHESTER JOHN B.   USN   Radio contact lost

11-Mar-68   WORLEY DON F.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY CIV/LOCKHEED

02-Mar-66   WORST KARL EDWARD   USAF

01-Apr-72   WORTH JAMES F.   USMC

30-Dec-67   WORTHAM MURRAY LAMAR   USAF

06-May-70   WORTHINGTON RICHARD C.   ARMY

17-Jan-67   WOZNIAK FREDERICK J.   USAF   No trace of crew

 21-Feb-67   WRIGHT ARTHUR   ARMY

13-Nov-70   WRIGHT DAVID I.   USAF

17-Jan-67   WRIGHT GARY G.   USAF   No trace of crew

27-Feb-68   WRIGHT THOMAS T.   USAF

21-May-67   WROBLESKI WALTER F.   ARMY

10-Mar-66    XAVIER AUGUSTO MARIA    USMC

17-May-68   YOUNG CHARLES L.   ARMY

04-Apr-70   YOUNG JEFFREY J.   ARMY

25-Aug-67    ZAVOCKY JAMES JOHN    USN

27-Feb-67   ZEMPLE RONALD L.   USN

15-Apr-66   ZERBE MICHAEL R.   USN

03-Apr-72   ZICH LARRY A.   ARMY

29-Aug-69   ZIMMER JERRY ALLEN   USMC

24-Apr-72   ZOLLICOFFER FRANKLIN   ARMY

17-Sep-72   ZORN THOMAS ONEAL JR.   USAF

01-Mar-71   ZUBKE DELAND D.   ARMY

20-Apr-68   ZUTTERMAN JOSEPH A. JR.   USMC

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part VII, R-S


In continuation of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, I will continue to list the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

 

18-Oct-66   RACKLEY INZAR M.    USAF

31-May-66   RAGLAND DAYTON W.   USAF

14-May-66   RALSTON FRANK D. III   USAF   (Photo)

23-May-69   RAMIREZ ARMANDO   ARMY

23-Jan-68   RAMSDEN GERALD LEE   USN

29-Apr-75   RANDOLPH CLIFFORD   CIV   Left Saigon 05/75

15-May-79   RAPP JEFF   CIV   Released Algernon s/v 07/79

16-Oct-69   RATTIN DENNIS M.   ARMY

16-Apr-70   RAUSCH ROBERT E.   USAF

15-Nov-66   RAVENNA HARRY M. III   ARMY

29-Dec-65   RAWSTHORNE EDGAR A.   USN

18-Mar-68   RAY JAMES M.   ARMY   (Photo)

13-Nov-69   RAY RONALD E.   ARMY

05-Sep-67   RAYMOND PAUL D.   USAF   (Photo)

24-Aug-68   READ CHARLES H. JR.   USAF

24-Jul-70   REED JAMES W.   USAF

29-Apr-75   REED THERESA   CIV   Left Saigon 06/76

16-Jan-68   REEDY WILLIAM HENRY JR.   USN

23-Dec-66   REEVES JOHN HOWARD   USMC

29-Apr-75   REGAN JOHN D.   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   REGAN LON THI   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

09-Nov-67   REHN GARY LEE   USMC

12-Jan-67   REINECKE WAYNE CONRAD   USN

25-Sep-66   REITER DEAN W.   USMC

20-Nov-69   RENELT WALTER A.   USAF

03-Jul-66    RENO RALPH J.   ARMY

09-Mar-69   REX ROBERT F.   USAF

03-Apr-68   REXROAD RONALD REUEL   USAF

21-Nov-67   REYNOLDS DAVID R.   ARMY

26-Apr-72   REYNOLDS TERRY L.   CIV

03-Jan-71   RHODES FERRIS A JR.   ARMY

02-May-70   RICHARDSON DALE W.   ARMY   Acft found, no trace of subj

30-Nov-65   RICHARDSON STEPHEN G.   USN

16-May-68   RICKEL DAVID J.   USAF   (Photo)

28-Oct-68   RICKER WILLIAM E.   USN

25-Dec-72   RICKMAN DWIGHT G.   USMC   Reported buried at crash w/ Viet observer

22-Apr-68   RIGGINS ROBERT P.   USAF

11-Jun-67   RIGGS THOMAS F.   ARMY

10-Nov-66   RIORDAN JOHN M.   USN

29-Apr-75   RIOS JOSE   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

27-Dec-71   RITTER GEORGE L.   CIV

29-Apr-75   RIVERA FREDERICK   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

12-Nov-67   ROARK JAMES D.   USN

07-Apr-65   ROARK WILLIAM MARSHALL   USN   Remains not returned as reported on 03/77

22-Jun-69   ROBERSON JOHN W.   ARMY

18-Jun-65   ROBERTS HAROLD J. JR.   USAF

25-Mar-69   ROBERTS RICHARD D.   ARMY

20-May-68   ROBERTSON JOHN H.   ARMY

10-Feb-71   ROBERTSON MARK J.   ARMY

09-Mar-70   ROBINSON EDWARD   ARMY

12-Mar-69   ROBINSON FLOYD H.   ARMY

05-Jan-70   ROBINSON LARRY WARREN   USMC

29-Apr-75   RODILL DANIEL   CIV   Expelled from Saigon 08/75

12-Feb-68   ROE JERRY L.   ARMY

18-Jan-68   ROEHRICH RONALD L.   USN

01-Dec-69   ROGERS BILLIE LEE   USN

04-May-67   ROGERS CHARLES E.   USAF

12-Mar-68   ROGERS EDWARD F.   USMC

27-Aug-70   ROGERS LYLE D.   ARMY

19-Mar-68   ROMERO VICTOR   USAF

17-Jun-66   ROMIG EDWARD L.   USN

02-Jun-66   ROSATO JOSEPH FRANK   USAF

05-Mar-70   ROSENBACH ROBERT P.   USAF

01-Aug-68   ROSS JOESPH S.   USAF   (Photo)

25-Mar-71   ROSSANO RICHARD J.   ARMY

27-Jun-65   ROTH BILLIE L.   USAF

3-Jun-70   ROZO JAMES M.   ARMY

24-May-68   RUCKER EMMETT JR.   USAF

30-Jun-67   RUNNELS GLYN L. JR.   USMC

16-Jun-68   RUPINSKI BERNARD FRANCIS   USN

26-Apr-72   RUSSELL RICHARD L.   USAF

11-May-69   RYAN WILLIAM C. JR.   USMC

09-Jun-70   RYDER JOHN L.   USAF   (Photo)

18-Aug-66   RYKOSKEY EDWARD J.   USMC

28-Apr-68    SAAVEDRA ROBERT    USN

 30-Jun-70   SADLER MITCHELL OLEN JR.    USAF

10-Jun-65   SAEGAERT DONALD R.   ARMY   Last seen on ground under fire

23-Jun-69   SAGE LELAND C.   USN

31-MAY-70   SAKAI KOJIRO   CIV   Not on Official DIA list

02-Oct-69   SALAZAR FIDEL G.   USN

07-Jun-67   SALE HAROLD R.   USAF

30-Jun-70   SANDERS WILLIAMS S.   USAF

12-May-68   SANDS RICHARD E.   ARMY

10-Dec-64   SANSONE DOMINICK   ARMY   Mixed (Viet?) remains returned 07/17/84

10-Aug-72   SANSONE JAMES J.   USN

27-Feb-67   SAUSE BERNARD J. JR.   USN   Blown off carrier

17-Jun-66   SAVOY M.J.   USN

20-Mar-68   SAYRE LESLIE B.   ARMY

03-Jan-73   SCAIFE KENNETH DOYLE   USN

24-Aug-67   SCHELL RICHARD J.   ARMY

29-Dec-68   SCHERDIN ROBERT F.   ARMY   Severely wounded when left

01-Mar-68   SCHEURICH THOMAS E.   USN

12-Jul-67   SCHIELE JAMES F.   ARMY

18-Feb-69   SCHIMMELS EDDIE R.   USN

15-Aug-70   SCHMIDT PETER A.   ARMY

09-Jun-68   SCHMIDT WALTER R. JR.   USMC   Reported alive on ground

23-May-67   SCHMITTOU EUREKA LAVERN   USN

10-Nov-66   SCHODERER ERIC J.   USN

09-Mar-70   SCHOEPPNER LEONARD J.   USN

16-Jan-66   SCHOONOVER CHARLES D.   USN

18-Feb-66   SCHROEFFEL THOMAS ANTHONY   USN

15-Dec-69   SCHUMACHER JAMES K.   ARMY

16-Jun-65   SCHUMANN JOHN R.   ARMY   Egress: reported working slave labor on rice mill

09-Apr-67   SCHWORER RONALD P.   ARMY

21-Aug-67   SCOTT DAIN V.   USN

25-Apr-68   SCOTT DAVID L.   ARMY   KIA in ambush, remains left behind

15-Mar-66   SCOTT MARTIN R.   USAF

13-May-69   SCOTT MIKE J.   ARMY

22-Apr-69   SCOTT VINCENT CALVIN JR   USAF

16-Mar-71   SCRIVENER STEPHEN RUSSELL   USAF

12-Mar-70   SCULL GARY B.   ARMY

04-Nov-66   SCUNGIO VINCENT A.   USAF

21-Dec-67   SCURLOCK LEE D.   ARMY

18-Jul-68   SEABLOM EARL F.   ARMY

30-Apr-72   SEAGRAVES MELVIN DOUGLAS   USN

25-Nov-67   SEARFUS WILLIAM HENRY   USN

16-Mar-71   SEELEY DOUGLAS MILTON   USAF

12-Mar-75   SEIDL ROBERT   CIV   Air Vietnam crash

22-Jan-66   SENNETT ROBERT R.   USN

02-Apr-72   SEREX HENRY M.   USAF

23-Aug-68   SETTERQUIST FRANCIS L.   USAF   (Photo)

06-Jun-72   SEUELL JOHN W.   USAF

15-Mar-71   SEXTON DAVID M.   ARMY

03-Jul-67   SEYMOUR LEO E.   ARMY   (Photo)

19-Apr-68   SHAFER PHILIP R.   ARMY

24-May-68   SHANKS JAMES LEE   USAF

03-Mar-68   SHANNON PATRICK LEE   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY CIV/LOCKHEED – 12/07/2005 – Family releases to (FOX NEWS) media fact that remains have been I.D.’d

05-Sep-74   SHARMAN NEIL   CIV

05-Sep-65   SHAW EDWARD B.   USN

11-Nov-67   SHAW GARY F.   ARMY   Body gone

08-Oct-70   SHAY DONALD E. JR.   USAF   (Photo)

20-Apr-65   SHEA JAMES PATRICK   USN

29-Apr-75   SHEA MICHAEL J.   USMC

29-Apr-65   SHELTON CHARLES E.   USAF   Radio contact, reported died as POW (Photo)

05-FEB-69   SHERBURN HUGH L.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list

03-Nov-70   SHEWMAKE JOHN D. SR.   ARMY

10-Feb-71   SHIMAMOTO KEIZABURO   CIV

09-Dec-68   SHIMEK SAMUEL D.   ARMY

12-Jul-72   SHIMKIN ALEX   CIV   

28-Jan-70   SHINN WILLIAM C.   USAF   

18-Oct-66   SHONECK JOHN R.   USAF   

09-Jun-66   SHORACK THEODORE JAMES JR   USAF  

24-Apr-69   SHRIVER JERRY M.   ARMY 

17-Jun-66   SIEGWARTH DONALD E.   USN   

25-Apr-71   SIGAFOOS WALTER H. III   USAF   (Photo)

29-Mar-72   SIMMONS ROBERT E.   USAF   Remains Returned 03/01/86 – family did not accept ID – group burial -6/17/2010

16-Aug-75   SIMMONS WILLIE E.   CIV   Released 1975?

12-May-68   SIMPSON JOSEPH L.   ARMY   

24-Jan-67   SIMPSON MAX C.   ARMY   

28-Aug-62   SIMPSON ROBERT LEWIS   USAF   

21-May-67   SIMPSON WALTER S.   ARMY   

26-Jan-69   SINGLETON DANIEL E.   USAF   

28-JAN-68   SINGSON WILFREDO D.   USMC   

15-Jan-68   SKARMAN ORVAL H.   USMC   No return from R&R

16-May-70   SKEEN RICHARD ROBERT   USN   

02-Mar-70   SKIBBE DAVID W.   USMC   

19-Dec-71   SKILES THOMAS W.   ARMY   

12-Dec-70   SKINNER OWEN G.   USAF   

06-Mar-67   SMALL BURT C.   ARMY   Reported wounded and captured

16-Jun-73   SMALLWOOD JOHN J.   USAF   

20-Jul-69   SMILEY STANLEY K.   USN   

01-May-67   SMITH CARL ARTHUR   USMC   

15-Mar-67   SMITH DEAN JR.   USN   

03-Apr-65   SMITH GEORGE C.   USAF   

08-Jan-68   SMITH HALLIE W.   USAF   

12-Nov-69   SMITH HARRY WINFIELD   USAF 

30-Sep-68   SMITH HOWARD H.   USAF   

04-Apr-71   SMITH JOSEPH S.   USAF   

30-May-68   SMITH LEWIS P. II   USAF   

19-Aug-69   SMITH ROBERT N.   USMC   

28-Nov-70   SMITH RONALD E.   ARMY   

17-Jan-69   SMITH VICTOR A.   USAF   (Photo)

22-Jun-66   SMITH WARREN P. JR.   USAF

23-Jul-66   SMITH WILLIAM W.   USAF   

10-Mar-71   SMOOT CURTIS R.   ARMY   

28-Apr-70   SNIDER HUGHIE F.   ARMY   

23-May-67   SOUCY RONALD PHILIP   USN   

01-May-67   SOULIER DUWAYNE   USMC   

17-May-71   SOYLAND DAVID P.   ARMY   

05-Feb-66   SPARENBERG BERNARD JOHN   USN   

19-Mar-71   SPARKS JON M.   ARMY   

07-Jun-68   SPENCER DEAN C. III   ARMY   

27-Sep-66   SPILMAN DYKE A.   USAF   

21-Apr-68   SPINDLER JOHN GATES   USMC   

30-Sep-68   SPINELLI DOMENICK A.   USN   

24-Jan-66   SPRICK DOYLE R.   USMC   

03-Mar-68   SPRINGSTEADAH DONALD K.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list TDY CIV/LOCKHEED

03-Jun-67   SPRINGSTON THEODORE JR.   USAF

10-Jan-69   SPROTT ARTHUR R. JR.   USAF   

22-May-68   ST PIERRE DEAN PAUL   USAF   

30-Apr-68   STAEHLI BRUCE W.   USMC   

21-Nov-72   STAFFORD RONALD D.   USAF   

03-Feb-71   STANDERWICK ROBERT L. SR.   USAF   

06-Feb-69   STANLEY CHARLES I.   ARMY

01-Apr-67   STANLEY ROBERT W.   USAF   

02-Dec-66   STARK WILLIE E.   ARMY   

11-Nov-67   STATON ROBERT M. JR.   ARMY   Body gone

26-Nov-71   STEADMAN JAMES E.   USAF   (Photo)

31-May-66   STEEN MARTIN W.   USAF   Good chute, harness empty

28-Feb-68   STEGMAN THOMAS   USN   

08-May-67   STEIMER THOMAS JACK   USN   

05-Feb-70   STEPHENSON RICHARD C.   USN

29-Apr-75   STEVENS F.   CIV   

14-Feb-69   STEVENS LARRY J.   USN   

24-Mar-67   STEWART JACK T.   ARMY   

08-Feb-71   STEWART PAUL C.   ARMY   

15-Mar-66   STEWART PETER J.   USAF   

12-May-67   STEWART ROBERT A.   USAF   

17-May-69   STEWART VIRGIL G.   USAF   

27-Sep-66   STINE JOSEPH M.   USAF   

14-Sep-66   STODDARD CLARENCE W. JR   USN   

07-Jan-68   STONE JAMES M.   ARMY   

28-Oct-68   STONEBRAKER KENNETH A.   USAF   

13-Jun-69   STORY JAMES C.   ARMY   

10-Jan-67   STOVES MERRITT III   ARMY

26-Apr-68   STOW LILBURN RAY   USAF   

21-Mar-68   STOWERS AUBREY E. JR.   USAF   

18-Oct-70   STRAIT DOUGLAS F.   ARMY   

18-Jan-64   STRALEY JOHN L.   ARMY   

04-Mar-71   STRAWN JOHN T.   ARMY   

05-Oct-68   STRIDE JAMES D. JR.   ARMY   

30-Nov-70   STRINGER JOHN C. II   ARMY   

03-Feb-73   STRINGHAM WILLIAM STERLIN   USN   

11-May-72   STROBRIDGE RODNEY L.   ARMY   

22-Jun-71   STROHLEIN MADISON A.   ARMY   Indications of shootout with NVA

25-May-72   STRONG HENRY H.   USN   

28-Oct-68   STROVEN WILLIAM H.   USAF   

20-Dec-72   STUART JOHN F.   USAF   

20-Oct-69   STUBBS WILLIAM W.   ARMY   

11-Nov-67   STUCKEY JOHN S. JR.   ARMY   Body gone

27-Nov-68   STUIFBERGEN GENE PAUL   USAF   

12-May-68   STULLER JOHN C.   ARMY   Ground attack

15-Nov-69   SUBER RANDOLPH B.   ARMY   

02-Dec-66   SULANDER DANIEL A.   ARMY   

12-Feb-67   SULLIVAN MARTIN J.   USN   

12-Jul-67   SULLIVAN ROBERT J.   ARMY   

31-Dec-71   SUTTER FREDERICK J.   USAF   

28-Jan-70   SUTTON WILLIAM C.   USAF   

09-Oct-69   SUYDAM JAMES L.   ARMY   

15-Jun-67   SWANSON JOHN WILLARD   USAF   

31-Oct-68   SWANSON ROGER W.   ARMY   

05-Feb-69   SWIGART PAUL E. JR.   USN   

18-Mar-68   SWITZER JERROLD A.   USMC   

30-Dec-67   SWORDS SMITH III   USAF   

04-Apr-67   SZEYLLER EDWARD PHILIP   USN

Photo credit: www.emaze.com