Let It Rain, Let It Rain, Let It Rain


Although Olympic focus has been trained on Rio, the gringa would like to take the dear reader back in time and to the other side of the globe to the 2008 Beijing Olympics. When China was preparing to host this historical event, pollution was high on the list of problems to solve. Although everyone is probably familiar with the tactic of temporary bans on driving & factory operations as drastic measures to help reduce smog. What many may not be aware of is China’s ambitious plans to control the weather, a $30 million dollar plan that they are still working on today. A plan to shoot into the heavens special “bullets” filled with salt and other minerals. What in the world are those crazy Chinese scientists up to? Apparently, nothing new! They’re just trying to make it rain.

Officially called “weather modification”, China helped clear their smog-filled skies during the Olympic games by making it rain, rain, rain. They are not alone in being rainmakers. Fifty-two other countries have developed their own rainmaking strategies. Ten of these countries joining the rainmaking team only five years ago. Rainmaking countries include: Canada, United States, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Australia, India, Senegal, South Africa, Russia and the list goes on. You can see the map created by the World Meteorological Organization to see who all is in on the rainmaking game.

The gringa is rather ashamed to admit that as for the United States, the origins of its weather modification program is not as noble as China’s. For the U.S., it all started with Operation Popeye which was a top secret program that weaponized weather during the Vietnam War. Although I’m sure the scientists who worked for General Electric had noble intentions, they probably had no idea that the U.S. government was going to take their technology and rain down silver iodide on the poor Vietnamese people.

But I digress. Back to China. In addition to creating rain to saturate polluted air and get rid of smog, they also wanted to prevent rain from spoiling events taking place in the stadium that was dubbed the “Bird’s Nest”. To achieve this amazing god-like feat, the Chinese implemented a 3 stage weather modification strategy:

  1. Officials tracked weather patterns with satellites, planes, radar and supercomputer.
  2. 2 aircraft, 20 rocket launcher & artillery sites sprayed silver iodide and dry ice into remote cloud systems that might approach the stadium so they would dump their rain before arrival.
  3. Nearby cloud systems filled with rain were seeded with chemicals that shrink the water droplets thus ensuring that the clouds would have time to pass over the Bird’s Nest without dropping their rain.

Now was all of this really necessary? The Beijing Olympics were held in August which is a high precipitation season for China so, yes, the gringa supposes that it was necessary. Consequently, China’s success in being a master rainmaker or rainstaller has resulted in China being the world leader in the weather modification sciences. They have more than 1,500 professionals devoted to all things necessary in controlling the weather: scientists, pilots, flight crews. Also proudly serving in the program are tens of thousands of peasant farmers who are more than happy to help their government blast away a cloud when crops have been inundated or have clouds seeded during times of drought. Peasants are on call to operate more than 7,000 aircraft guns and almost 5,000 rocket launchers when called to report to rainmaking duty.

The gringa is not too sure what to make of all this. For the most part I am the type to believe that the less we interfere with nature, the better. However, considering how bad mankind has screwed things up where climate change is concerned, it may just be that Mother Nature could use a few rainmakers. So, I say to the Chinese:

Let it rain. Let it rain. Let it rain.

 

Sources:

www.technologyreview.com

www.wmo.int

uspto.gov

fas.org

wikipedia.org/OperationPopeye

Image Credit:  cloudfront.net

 

 

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Operation Highjump – Not The Launch of a Dark Ops Space Program


Certain conspiracy theorists (CTs) have put forth that there is a dark ops space program called Dark Fleet that is an offshoot of technology and goals that originated with secret societies that organized during the heyday of Nazi Germany. The members of these organizations were not so much devoted Nazis but, rather, exploited the resources and power of the Nazi party in order to realize their fantastical dream of reuniting with a superpower, extra-terrestrial, master race.

After the Nazi empire crumbled when they lost World War II, many of the members of the secret societies relocated to other countries and kept their dreams and research alive, supposedly developing advanced weapons and spacecraft technology. As proof, CTs offer up the records of Admiral Byrd’s expeditions to the North and South Poles. The gringa says, “Well, let’s take a look at those records.”

There is a wealth of information about Admiral Byrd but the gringa wants to stick with facts and eyewitness accounts. To begin with, a look at official military records. Is there anything interesting there? Hmmm. Let us see…

From 1946-1947 the U.S. Navy had Operation Highjump underway. This operation was overseen by the U.S. Navy Antarctic Developments Program. Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, Jr. was Officer in Charge, leading Task Force 68, and Rear Admiral Richard H. Cruzen was commanding officer. When these two admirals put to sea, they were joined by 4,700 seamen and airmen, 13 military ships, and 33 military aircraft. To achieve the goal of establishing a research base, Little America IV, it sounds like an awful lot of firepower was put into play, but, that’s just the gringa’s curious little mind in overdrive. It could have been perfectly normal to pack all that weaponry on an Antarctic excursion.

The published objectives of the mission were:

  • Personnel training and equipment testing in subzero temperatures
  • Evaluate how to establish, maintain and utilize Antarctic military bases and scout sites
  • Develop techniques for creating, maintaining and using military bases in ice
  • Make new discoveries of the following Antarctic conditions: electromagnetics, geological, geographic, hydrographic, and meteorological

Up until this time it was primarily the British who had spent time exploring Antarctica with eleven expeditions from 1898-1945. Other countries who had explored the earth’s South Pole region: France (2 missions); Germany (3) missions; Belgium, Japan, Norway, and Sweden (all a single mission). Operation High Jump was the second U.S. mission, following the conclusion of Byrd’s initial exploratory expedition four years earlier.

The fleet of ships arrived in the Antarctic December 12, 1946 and immediately set up weather monitoring stations. Within 12 days of arrival aircraft was in the air flying reconnaissance missions. Some of the ships that were in the flotilla:

  • Henderson – Destroyer class, commissioned in 1945 and served with distinction for 35 years receiving (8) battle stars for service in the Korean War and (7) battle stars and a commendation for service in the Vietnam War; armament at the time of Operation Highjump: (6) 5” guns, (12) 40mm anti-aircraft (AA) guns; (11) 20mm AA guns; (10) 21” torpedo tubes
  • Cacapon – Cimarron class fleet oiler; commissioned 1943, decommissioned 1973 and scrapped; armament: (1) 5” gun; (4) 3” guns; (4) twin 40mm AA guns; (4) twin 20mm AA guns
  • Currituck – Currituck class seaplane tender, nicknamed “Wild Goose”; commissioned June 1944, decommissioned October 31 1967, scrapped 1971; armament: (4) 5” guns

Eighteen days after arrival (3) men were killed when their plane crashed during a blizzard. Six crewmen survived the crash and were rescued two weeks later. The remains of the plane and the three lost airmen have never been recovered. The aircraft they were flying was a Martin PBM Mariner. This craft is a patrol bomber flying boat. Standard armament for the Mariners were: (8) 50” machine guns, 2 tons of bombs or depth charges or (2) Mark 13 torpedoes. The gringa can only ask why a bomber would be needed in an exploratory, scientific expedition in Antarctica?

An interesting thing to note is that there was a Navy chaplain serving on the mission. He held a religious service and consecrated Antarctica. The gringa scratches her head and wonders if this is typical or strange? I’m no Catholic so I wouldn’t know.

New Year’s Day, 1947, American dive team began exploring underneath Antarctic ice shelves. The gringa supposes this may have been related to search efforts to locate the downed bomber. No big mystery there.

Two weeks later an airfield was constructed and named “Little America IV”. Within a month, late February, weather conditions worsened and the expedition was terminated. The return trip home would have the expedition making a stop in March along the South American coast. Admiral Byrd gave interviews and a Chilean newspaper, El Mercurio, reported. The most interesting quote the gringa will share is often cited by CTs to prove that something dark was afoot underneath the ice:

“… Byrd warned today that the United States should adopt measures of protection against the possibility of an invasion of the country by hostile planes coming from the polar regions.”

Now, was Byrd’s warning because he thought something sinister was going on secretly at either the North or South Pole? No. That’s not what his warning was about. CTs take that important quote out of context. They don’t usually reveal the rest of the interview which explains Byrd’s reasoning.

He recognized that technology meant the world was shrinking. America was no longer safe from enemy invasion because of isolation and distance. It was well within the capabilities of other nations to fly from one side of the globe, passing over either pole, and reach the U.S. Byrd was not fearful of a threat from an extra-terrestrial master race living within the earth and Antarctica being its headquarters.

So why all the firepower on an exploratory mission? It was right after World War II. The U.S. had already experienced the surprise air assault of Pearl Harbor. The militaries of the Allied Powers knew that Germany had been developing new weapons and technologies. The Navy had no idea what to expect and was taking no chances. The gringa says, “I don’t blame them.” So, no big suspicious, nefarious plot behind packing all the big guns on an expedition to Antarctica.

Just a few of the vessels that comprised the fleet’s complement:

  • Sikorsky R-4 helicopter
  • (2) Coastguard icebreakers
  • US Navy icebreaker
  • (2) Seaplane Tenders
  • (2) Destroyers
  • (2) Tankers
  • Battleship
  • (2) Supply ships
  • Submarine
  • Aircraft carrier (Byrd’s ship)

The gringa thinks that the main reason behind U.S. interest in Antarctica at that time is the same ol’, same ol’ imperialistic territory seeking mentality that has motivated the country’s interest throughout history. Great Britain had spent a lot of time in Antarctica. They also created all sorts of problems over the Falkland Islands. When the U.S. decided to stick their big nose in and establish a military base in Antarctica most of Latin America was none too happy about it.

The Cold War was getting under way and Russia was perfectly suited to wage war in the bitter conditions of a European winter. Americans? Not so much. So, according to official records the expedition to Antarctica was absolutely about military strategy. Not about little green men living under the ice. But, then, there’s Admiral Byrd’s personal diaries. What do they say? Well, come back and see what the gringa finds out!

Sources: Wikipedia and http://www.navy.mil

Photo credit: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz

 

 

Improving The World Has Gone Glam… GEOGlam That Is


Food security in the world is critical to the security of the world in general. When populations become vulnerable due to famine and food shortages, terrible things can happen. Things like wars, massive migrations, malnutrition related disease epidemics, etc. With climate change posing a real threat to the future of food security worldwide, what the heck is being done about this problem?

The international community has come together to go “glam”. No, there is nothing glamorous about hunger. Rather, a group of government leaders, as well as NGO leaders, have formed and call themselves the Group on Earth Observation’s Global Agricultural Monitoring, or, to avoid saying that mouthful, GEOGLAM. They plan to take full advantage of Earth images provided by NASA’s satellites, along with data provided by the space agencies of other nations, to monitor weather and how it will affect the security of crops.

Satellites are not the only hi-tech hardware being put to use. While out in the field, GEOGLAM workers collect data on smartphones and relay it via the internet to GEOGLAM partners. This makes data collection much more efficient and stream lined. No more need to do all that pesky paperwork. The gringa likes that. The gringa likes even better the name for this mobile system of data collection, “MAGIS”. The gringa looks at her smartphone, smiles, and says, “It’s MAGIS!”

Rice is first on the list of crops GEOGLAM monitors. It is the staple grain for not only the largest portion of Earth’s population, but also it’s most vulnerable populations. And it is no easy grain to cultivate. Flood or drought could cause a worldwide starvation catastrophe. Other key crops being monitored are wheat, corn (maize), cotton and sugarcane.

Orbiting satellites provide thermal images of crops that enable GEOGLAM agricultural experts to determine if crop stress is occurring. These hi-tech images can relay such details as moisture and temperature levels of the surface of the land the crop is planted in. This can help create models to protect the viability of critical crops.

Images also provide data that help scientists predict weather patterns. This enables measures to be taken to protect crops in the event of the approach of severe weather. Although it is fine to love your local weatherman who reminds you to take an umbrella with you to work, GEOGLAM’s weathermen are the weathermen that are helping to save the world. The gringa holds them high upon the meteorological pedestal.

GEOGLAM’s eyes in the skies have begun their rice monitoring projects in the nations of Pakistan, Indonesia, Vietnam and Java. In the U.S., Arkansas, and agricultural areas such as Sacramento Valley in California, are also being watched because their water resources are rapidly being depleted. Data processed by GEOGLAM is used to create growing season plans as well as help farmers in these areas manage their local resources, primarily the precious resource of water that is used to irrigate the crops.

A visit to GEOGLAM’s website puts a smile on the gringa’s face. There’s nothing the gringa likes more than solutions. The gringa’s a fixer, a problem-solver, a get ‘er done kind of gal. It’s okay to complain but then you’ve got to get off your bum and FIX IT!

GEOGLAM officially launched in Paris, 2011, with the participation of 20 Agricultural Ministers from the world community. This group is setting out to monitor regions that “… are responsible for over 80% of global crop production…”. As data is gathered regarding these areas, GEOGLAM uses proven scientific methods to analyze weather and other evidence to create consensus based models that work toward the most favorable outcome of crop production and yield.

Although many countries have their own agricultural monitoring systems, GEOGLAM aims to lead the way into the global era. This is the future. Nations no longer live as islands but, rather, as part of a world community. Data is shared. Technologies are shared. Standardized methods are being implemented. It is the recognition that one nation’s food security is the concern of every other nation. The gringa loves this philosophy.

Never before has the world needed scientists and agricultural experts like it does today. These are the fields philanthropic, young students should be encouraged to pursue. If your child wants to change the world, encourage them to be a farmer or meteorologist!

 

Sources: www.nasa.gov and  www.geoglam-crop-monitor.org

Photo credit:  www.en.wikipedia.org

 

 

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget” Part V, K-M


In continuation of my blog post of Friday, August, 8, 2015, I will continue to list the names of the servicemen still unaccounted for from the Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The gringa will kindly remind dear readers that clicking on incident date, name, branch of service or side note will take the reader directly to a page regarding that serviceman that is linked with the website www.pownetwork.org. So, in honor of those POWs and MIAs considered with the November 9, 2000, immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”, the following men are not forgotten:

14-Jun-69   KAHLER HAROLD    USAF

29-Apr-75   KAJI ANDREW T.    CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   KALSSEN JAMES   CIV   Left Saigon 04/76

09-Aug-69   KANE BRUCE E.   USMC   

12-Sep-67   KANE RICHARD RAYMOND   USMC

20-May-67   KEEFE DOUGLAS ONEIL   USMC

15-Nov-66   KEIPER JOHN C.   USMC

21-Apr-66   KELLER JACK E.   USN

06-Aug-67   KEMMERER DONALD R.   USAF

12-Jan-67   KEMP CLAYTON CHARLES   USN

17-Aug-66   KEMP FREDDIE   ARMY

22-Dec-69   KENNEDY JAMES E.   ARMY

01-Nov-68   KENNEY HARRY J.   USN

20-Dec-68   KENT ROBERT DUANE   USMC

21-Jan-67   KERNS ARTHUR W.   ARMY   Not on Official DIA list – possible remains returned

26-Mar-68   KERR ERNEST C. JR.   USMC

13-Jun-66   KERR EVERETT O.   USAF

22-Aug-67   KERR JOHN C.   USAF

09-Jul-72   KETCHIE SCOTT D.   USMC

20-Jan-68   KETTERER JAMES A.   USAF

06-Feb-67   KIBBEY RICHARD A.   USAF

10-Feb-66   KIEFEL ERNEST P. JR.   USAF

29-Apr-75   KIEN CUONG TRIEU   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   KIEN NAM BAO   CIV

29-Apr-75   KIEN NGIEP TRIEU   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

26-Aug-67   KILCULLEN THOMAS MICHAEL   USAF

30-Jun-67   KILLEN JOHN D. III   USMC

18-Jun-72   KILPATRICK LARRY RONALD   USN

25-Dec-68   KING CHARLES D.   USAF

14-May-66   KING DONALD L.   USAF

29-Apr-75   KING JOHN S.   CIV   Left Saigon 04/76

04-May-68   KING PAUL C. JR.   ARMY

03-Oct-67   KING RONALD RUNYAN   USAF

01-Sep-68   KINKADE WILLIAM L.   USAF

15-Jan-71   KINSMAN GERALD F.   ARMY

14-Jul-66   KIPINA MARSHALL F.   ARMY

11-Mar-68   KIRK HERBERT A.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list – TDY CIV/LOCKHEED

01-Jan-66   KIRKSEY ROBERT L.   ARMY

29-Apr-75   KISTNER MITCHELL   CIV   Left Saigon 08/75

11-Jun-67   KLEMM DONALD MARTIN   USAF

17-Sep-65   KLENDA DEAN ALBERT   USAF

04-Nov-69   KLIMO JAMES R.   ARMY   Remains of all other crew recovered

02-Nov-66   KLINE ROBERT E.   USAF

06-Apr-70   KLINGNER MICHAEL LEE   USAF

14-Nov-70   KLUGG JOSEPH R.   USN

14-Mar-66   KLUTE KARL EDWIN   USAF

21-Oct-68   KNABB KENNETH K.   USN

02-Nov-67   KNAPP FREDRIC W.   USN

24-Apr-67   KNAPP HERMAN L.   USAF

09-Apr-70   KNIGHT LARRY C.   USN

07-Oct-66   KNIGHT LARRY DALE   USAF

19-May-67   KNIGHT ROY A. JR.   USAF

22-Sep-66   KNOCHEL CHARLES A.   USN

22-Mar-71   KNUTSEN DONALD P.   ARMY

05-Feb-70   KOBASHIGAWA TOM Y.   ARMY

14-Dec-66   KOENIG EDWIN LEE   USN

02-Oct-69   KOHLER DELVIN L.   USN

12-Mar-68   KOLLMANN GLENN E.   USN

16-Apr-69   KONYU WILLIAM M.   ARMY

11-Jun-67   KOOI JAMES W.   USMC   AC crash and explode, no surv obs

25-Dec-67   KOONCE TERRY T.   USAF   (Photo)

27-Oct-72   KOSIN BEATRICE   CIV   Not on Official DIA list, reported DIC (Photo)

27-Jul-65   KOSKO WALTER   USAF

02-Oct-69   KOSLOSKY HOWARD M.   USN

31-Oct-67   KOTT STEPHEN J.   USMC   Remains Recovered 07/17/84 – Family does not accept ID

30-Mar-75   KOWLES ALEXANDER G.   CIV   Left Saigon 10/75

05-Jun-72   KRANER DAVIS STANLEY   USN

16-Mar-68   KRAUSMAN EDWARD L.   USMC

01-Apr-66   KRECH MELVIN T.   USN

29-Apr-75   KRISH CLAUDIA   CIV   Left Saigon 07/75

17-Jan-67   KROGMAN ALVA R.   USAF

25-Oct-67   KROMMENHOEK JEFFREY M.   USN

11-Feb-69   KROSKE HAROLD W. JR.   ARMY

27-Apr-71   KRUPA FREDERICK   ARMY

03-Nov-67   KRUSI PETER H.   USN

31-Jan-67   KUBLEY ROY R.   USAF

17-Jan-69   KUHLMAN ROBERT JOHN JR.   USMC

06-APR-70   KUSAKA AKIRA   CIV   Not on Official Lists

08-Nov-67   KUSICK JOSEPH G.   ARMY

06-Apr-68   KUSTIGIAN MICHAEL T.   USN   Listed as UA in 1973

18-Aug-71   KUYKENDALL WILLIE C.   ARMY

 30-Nov-68    LA BOHN GARY R.    ARMY   Remains Returned 03/08/89 – Id’d 02/08/90 Questionable

 05-Sep-65   LA GRAND WILLIAM J.   ARMY

08-May-65   LA HAYE JAMES D.   USN

19-Sep-68   LA VOO JOHN ALLEN   USMC

31-Jan-68   LACEY RICHARD J.   ARMY

24-Aug-68   LADEWIG MELVIN E.   USAF

06-Apr-66   LAFAYETTE JOHN W.   ARMY

29-Apr-75   LAFFIE GEORGE   CIV

29-Apr-75   LAFFIE LINA MARLINE   CIV

17-Jun-70   LAKER CARL J.   ARMY   Head wound, search neg

13-Jun-66   LAMBTON BENNIE R.   USN

03-Jan-68   LANCASTER KENNETH R.   ARMY

23-Aug-67   LANE CHARLES   USAF

23-May-68   LANE GLEN O.   ARMY

04-Jan-69   LANE MITCHELL S.   USAF

01-Mar-68   LANNOM RICHARD C.   USN

05-Sep-67   LAPORTE MICHAEL L.   USN

30-Mar-69   LATIMER CLARENCE A.   ARMY

20-Feb-68   LAUREANO-LOPEZ ISMAEL   ARMY

29-Apr-75   LAURIE JAMES   CIV   Expelled from Saigon 08/75

26-Oct-71   LAUTZENHEISER MICHAEL   ARMY   4 sets remains found at crash site, not subj

05-Oct-68   LAWRENCE GREGORY P.   USAF

29-Jul-66   LAWS DELMER L.   ARMY

09-Apr-68   LAWSON KARL W.   ARMY

05-Nov-69   LE FEVER DOUGLAS P.   USAF

08-May-72   LEAVER JOHN M. JR.   USN

19-Jun-64   LEDBETTER THOMAS I.   ARMY

16-Feb-72   LEE ALBERT EUGENE   USN

28-Jan-70   LEESER LEONARD C.   USAF

13-Apr-72   LEET DAVID LAVERETT   USMC

18-Jun-67   LEMMONS WILLIAM E.   ARMY

25-Apr-71   LEMON JEFFREY C.   USAF

15-Feb-71   LEONARD MARVIN M.   ARMY

02-Oct-69   LEONARD ROBERT B.   USN

20-Aug-72   LESTER RODERICK B.   USN

27-Feb-67   LETCHWORTH EDWARD N.   USN   Blown off Carrier deck

25-Oct-66   LEVAN ALVIN L.   USN

02-Apr-72   LEVIS CHARLES A.   USAF

19-Oct-66   LEWANDOWSKI LEONARD J. JR.   USMC

17-May-67   LEWIS CHARLIE G.   ARMY

27-Feb-71   LEWIS LARRY G.   USN

04-Oct-67   LILLUND WILLIAM A.   USAF

09-Apr-71   LILLY CARROLL BAXTER   USAF

17-Mar-71   LILLY LAWRENCE E.   ARMY

06-Jan-73   LINDAHL JOHN C.   USN

20-Aug-68   LINDBLOOM CHARLES DAVID   USN

29-Jun-65   LINDSEY MARVIN NELSON   USAF

02-Jan-70   LINDSTROM RONNIE G.   USAF

29-Apr-75   LINH DAM   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

21-Apr-68   LINK ROBERT C.   ARMY

09-Dec-67   LIRA JOSE T.   ARMY

23-Apr-70   LITTLE DANNY L.   ARMY

02-Oct-69   LIVINGSTON RICHARD A.   USN

02-Dec-65   LOGAN JACOB DRUMMOND   USN

26-Mar-68   LOMAX RICHARD E.   ARMY

20-Dec-69   LONG CARL EDWIN   USMC

18-Oct-66   LONG JOHN H.   USAF

08-Jul-66   LONGANECKER RONALD LEE   USMC

19-Apr-68   LORD ARTHUR JAMES   ARMY

01-Mar-69   LOVEGREN DAVID E.   ARMY

18-Jun-65   LOWRY TYRRELL G.   USAF

23-Apr-70   LUCKI AUBIN E.   USAF   (Photo)

22-Dec-65   LUKENBACH MAX D.   USN

01-Feb-66   LUKER RUSSELL B.   USMC

20-Dec-66   LUM DAVID ANTHONY   USAF

10-Mar-69   LUNA CARTER P.   USAF

29-Apr-75   LUNDGREEN KIM DUNG   CIV   Left Saigon 12/75

29-Apr-75   LUNDGREEN KIM THO   CIV  

25-Jul-67   LUNSFORD HERBERT L.   USAF

29-Apr-75   LUSK ANDRE   CIV   Left Saigon with fake passport 08/75

23-Jan-69   LUSTER ROBERT L.   ARMY   Remains Recovered 01/27/69 – Id Disputed

10-May-71   LUTTRELL JAMES M.   ARMY

27-May-65   LYNN DOYLE W.   USN   Hit by AA in target area

05-FEB-68   LYNN HOMER M.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list

22-Mar-68   LYON DONOVAN L.   USAF

05-Feb-70   LYON JAMES M.   ARMY   Reported DIC 02/06/70 – mercy killingLeft Saigon 12/75

28-Mar-68    MACCANN HENRY E.   USAF

21-Dec-72   MACDONALD GEORGE D.   USAF    Remains Returned 02/21/85 – Id Rescinded by family (Photo)

21-Apr-68   MACKEDANZ LYLE E.   ARMY

02-Jan-66   MACLAUGHLIN DONALD C.   USN

21-Apr-78   MACNAMARA LEN   CIV   Held in Phnom Phenh jail until 11/78

20-May-67   MADDOX NOTLEY GWYNN   USAF

18-Jan-67   MADSEN MARLOW E.   USN

03-Jan-71   MAGEE PATRICK J.   ARMY

23-Mar-61   MAGEE RALPH WAYNE   USAF

04-Apr-65   MAGNUSSON JAMES A. JR.   USAF

06-Jul-68   MAHONEY THOMAS P. III   USMC

10-Aug-65   MAILHES LAWRENCE SCOTT   USN   Remains not found in search of acft

04-May-66   MALONE JIMMY M.   ARMY

21-Apr-67   MANGINO THOMAS A.   ARMY   Disappeared while on sampan

03-Nov-70   MANGUS ARLIE R.   ARMY

22-Oct-65   MANN ROBERT LEE   USAF

27-Mar-72   MANOR JAMES   USAF

24-May-69   MANSKE CHARLES J.  USAF

25-Jun-66   MARIK CHARLES W.   USN

30-May-70   MARK KIT T.   CIV

04-Mar-71   MARKER MICHAEL W.   ARMY

22-Jan-74   MARKHAM JAMES M.   CIV   Returned from Visit 12/74

15-May-75   MARSHALL DANNY G.   USMC   Mayaguez incident loss 05/15/75

18-Jun-65   MARSHALL JAMES A.   USAF

05-Sep-65   MARSHALL RICHARD C.   USAF

04-Apr-67   MARTIN DAVID EARL   USN

18-Apr-73   MARTIN DOUGLAS K.   USAF   Charred bodies found at crash site (Photo) Remains Buried 4/18/99

20-Sep-65   MARTIN DUANE W.   USAF   Reported killed by natives

23-Mar-75   MARTIN EARL   CIV   Released from Saigon 07/75

03-Nov-70   MARTIN JERRY D.   ARMY

16-Oct-70   MARTIN JOHN B. II   USN

20-Nov-67   MARTIN JOHN M.   USAF

01-May-68   MARTIN RICHARD D.   ARMY

03-Jun-66   MARTIN RUSSELL D.   USAF   Wreckage sighted, no trace of crew

27-Dec-67   MARTIN SAMMY A.   USAF

11-Nov-67   MARTINEZ-MERCADO EDWIN J.   ARMY

14-Feb-67   MARVIN ROBERT C.   USN

02-May-69   MASCARI PHILLIP L.   USAF

17-Oct-68   MASON JAMES P.   ARMY

01-Oct-65   MASSUCCI MARTIN J.   USAF

13-Oct-68   MASTERSON MICHAEL J.   USAF

13-May-69   MASUDA ROBERT S.   ARMY   Possibly thrown into well

16-Apr-72   MATEJA ALAN P.   USAF

15-Feb-66   MAUTERER OSCAR   USAF

10-Oct-69   MAXWELL CALVIN W.   ARMY

02-Mar-69   MAY MICHAEL F.   ARMY

17-Oct-65   MAYER RODERICK L.   USN   Egress reports died of severe wounds from ejection

24-Nov-67   MAYERCIK RONALD M.   USAF

17-Aug-68   MAYHEW WILLIAM J.   USN   Listed as remains recovered 07/72 but returned alive 03/14/73

09-Nov-67   MAYSEY LARRY W.   USAF

23-Dec-70   MCANDREWS MICHAEL W.   ARMY

10-Nov-66   MCATEER THOMAS J.   USN

22-Oct-66   MCBRIDE EARL PAUL   USN

30-Dec-68   MCCANTS LELAND S. III   ARMY   Reported drowned in river crossing

14-Nov-65   MCCLELLAND PAUL T. JR.   USAF

24-Nov-63   MCCLURE CLAUDE DONALD   ARMY   Released in Cambodia 11/28/65

30-Apr-74   MCCOMBS PHILLIP A.   CIV   Released 05/74

05-Feb-66   MCCONNAUGHHAY DAN DAILY   USN

24-Sep-68   MCCONNELL JERRY   ARMY

06-Oct-72   MCCORMICK CARL O.   USAF

15-Dec-70   MCCOY MERIL O JR.   USN

26-Apr-68   MCDANIEL JOHN LEWIS   USAF

04-Oct-67   MCDANIEL MORRIS L. JR.   USAF

31-May-66   MCDONALD EMMETT R.   USAF

01-Jun-75   MCDONALD HERMAN   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

03-May-72   MCDONALD JOSEPH W.   USMC

31-Dec-64   MCDONALD KURT C.   USAF

25-Mar-71   MCDONNEL R.D.   ARMY   Reported KIA by grenade in ambush

06-Mar-69  MCDONNELL JOHN T.   ARMY

20-Jun-66   MCDONOUGH JOHN R.   USN

16-Aug-68   MCELHANON MICHAEL O.   USAF

18-Dec-72   MCELVAIN JAMES R.   USAF

22-Oct-65   MCEWEN JAMES ARTHUR   USAF

17-Apr-67   MCGARVEY JAMES M.   USMC

10-Dec-71   MCINTIRE SCOTT W.   USAF

24-Nov-70   MCINTOSH IAN   ARMY

04-Nov-70   MCKAY CLYDE W.   CIV   Escaped custody to join VC

06-Feb-68   MCKAY HOMER E.   USN

31-Mar-65   MCKINLEY GERALD W.   USN   Reported crashed on target site

18-Jun-67   MCKITTRICK JAMES C.   ARMY

18-Jun-70   MCLAMB HARRY LAWRENCE   USAF

20-Dec-72   MCLAUGHLIN ARTHUR V. JR.   USAF

07-Jul-67   MCLAUGHLIN OLEN B.   USAF

09-Feb-65   MCLEAN JAMES H.   ARMY   Capture confirmed

14-Jun-73   MCLEOD DAVID V. JR.   USAF

05-Jun-68   MCMANUS TRUMAN JOSEPH   USMC

07-Apr-68   MCMURRAY FRED H. JR.   ARMY

05-FEB-68   MCNEILL CLARENCE L.   USAF   Not on Official DIA list

30-Apr-67   MCPHEE RANDY NEAL   USMC

18-Mar-66   MCPHERSON EVERETT A.   USMC

28-Jan-66   MCPHERSON FRED LAWER   USAF

02-Mar-70   MCVEY LAVOY D.   USMC

13-Aug-65   MELLOR FREDRIC M.  USAF

18-Jan-64   METOYER BRYFORD G.   ARMY

21-Jun-71   METZLER CHARLES D.   USN

09-Feb-69   MEYERS ROGER A.   USN

10-Aug-69   MICKELSEN WILLIAM E. JR.   USN

25-Nov-67   MIDGETT DEWEY A.   ARMY   On way to beach (AWOL)

23-Aug-67   MIDNIGHT FRANCIS B.   USAF   (Photo)

29-Apr-75   MIELKE MADELINE XUAN   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   MIELKE RICHARD M.   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   MIELNE MISTY S.   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

29-Apr-75   MIKYO MAI LAN   CIV   Left Saigon 08/76

20-Aug-66   MILIKIN RICHARD M.III   USAF

27-Feb-68   MILIUS PAUL L.   USN

05-Sep-67   MILLER CARL D.   USAF

06-Jan-71   MILLER CARLTON P. JR.   USN

12-Mar-75   MILLER GEORGE C.   CIV   Air Vietnam

10-May-68   MILLER GLENN E.   ARMY   Remains ID announced 08/10/2005 – disputed/rejected by family.

12-Mar-75   MILLER JOHN D.   CIV   Released from Hanoi 10/75

12-Mar-75   MILLER LUANNE   CIV   Released from Hanoi 10/75

28-Mar-69   MILLER MICHAEL A.   USAF

22-Nov-65   MILLER RICHARD A.   USMC

28-Aug-68   MILLER ROBERT CHARLES   USAF

07-Mar-67   MILLER ROBERT L.   USN

13-Sep-70   MILLER WYATT JR.   ARMY

06-Mar-71   MILLINER WILLIAM P.   ARMY   (Photo)

29-Nov-67   MILLNER MICHAEL   ARMY

21-Sep-66   MILLS JAMES B.   USN

29-Jan-68   MILLS JAMES DALE   USMC

20-Dec-65   MIMS GEORGE I. JR.   USAF

09-Dec-68   MINOR CARROLL WILLIAM   USN

17-Jan-71   MIRRER ROBERT H.   USAF

19-Oct-66   MISHUK RICHARD E.   USMC

25-Apr-68   MITCHELL ALBERT C.   USAF

30-May-62   MITCHELL ARCHIE E.   CIV   Taken from Leprosarium

12-Mar-75   MITCHELL BETTY J.   CIV   Released from Hanoi 10/75

14-Jan-64   MITCHELL CARL BERG   USAF

06-Mar-68   MITCHELL GILBERT L.   USN

05-May-68   MITCHELL HARRY E.   USN   Reported seen in USA 09/79

29-Jan-71   MIXTER DAVID I.   ARMY

31-Jan-67   MIYAZAKI RONALD K.   USAF

26-Sep-67   MOE HAROLD JOHN   USMC

24-May-69   MONTEZ ANASTACIO   ARMY

02-Oct-69   MONTGOMERY RONALD W.   USN

22-Apr-61   MOON WALTER H.   ARMY   Reported KIA 07/22/61 in escape attempt

27-Feb-71   MOONEY FRED   ARMY

03-Sep-67   MOORE HERBERT W. JR.   USAF

28-Feb-67   MOORE JAMES RODNEY   USMC

16-Feb-69   MOORE JERRY L.   ARMY

03-May-67   MOORE RALPH E.   ARMY

09-Oct-69   MOORE RAYMOND G.   ARMY

20-Feb-70   MOORE SCOTT FERRIS JR.   USN

18-May-66   MOORE WILLIAM J.   USAF

02-Oct-69   MOORE WILLIAM R.   USN

06-Dec-68   MORALES FRANK A.   CIV   JCRC says KIA/DIC

07-Aug-66   MORAN RICHARD ALLAN   USN

16-Jan-68   MORELAND WILLIAM D.   USMC

10-Nov-67   MORGAN JAMES S.   USAF

25-Feb-72   MORGAN WILLIAM J.   ARMY

22-Mar-71   MORIARTY PETER G.   USAF

20-Dec-68   MORIN RICHARD GIRARD   USMC

27-Jan-73   MORRIS GEORGE W. JR.   USAF

26-Oct-66   MORRISON GLENN RAYMOND JR   USAF

19-Aug-69   MORRISSEY RICHARD THOMAS   USMC

07-Nov-72   MORRISSEY ROBERT D.   USAF

29-May-72   MORROW LARRY K.   ARMY

26-Sep-66   MOSBURG HENRY L.   ARMY

02-Oct-69   MOSER PAUL K.   USN

29-Apr-75   MOSLEY MONIQUE C.   CIV

29-Apr-75   MOSS JAMES   CIV

13-Sep-65   MOSSMAN JOE R.   USN

26-Mar-68   MOWREY GLENN W.   USMC

14-Dec-66   MOWREY RICHARD L.   USN

31-Jan-67   MULHAUSER HARVEY   USAF

29-Jan-68   MULLEAVEY QUINTEN EMILE   ARMY   Not on Official DIA list

29-Apr-66   MULLEN WILLIAM F.   USMC

08-May-69   MUNDT HENRY G.   USAF

13-May-69   MUNOZ DAVID L.   ARMY   Reported possibly thrown into well

03-Apr-72   MUREN THOMAS RICHARD   USN

18-Mar-69   MURPHY BARRY D.   ARMY

23-Apr-70   MURPHY LARRON D.   ARMY

09-Apr-65   MURPHY TERENCE M.   USN   Reported crashed at sea

18-Feb-66   MURRAY JOSEPH VAUGHN   USN

28-Sep-67   MUSETTI JOSEPH T. JR.   USN

08-Jun-67   MYERS DAVID GEPHART   USMC   Reported died near Hill 881S

Photo courtesy: www.telegraph.co.uk

POWs, MIAs, “We Will Never Forget”


November 9, 2000, the United States Congress enacted a new immigration policy known as the “Bring Them Home Alive Act”. This legislation was aimed at individuals who were  Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, North Korea and Chinese nationals, as well as anyone from a former independent Soviet state. The bill granted asylum and refugee status for any of these people who returned to the United States any U.S. prisoner of war or serviceman who was missing in action. Refugee and asylum status would also be given to their spouse and any children.

This bill also authorized an international radio and television broadcast designed to inform people in foreign countries of this program. Worldwide coverage would transmit the message to Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, China, North Korea and Russia. This program would receive twenty hours of airtime over a thirty day period. A website was designed with international access with information readily available.

Representative Sheila Jackson-Lee was so moved by the sentiment of this bill, she said this when she placed her “yea” vote: “This bill creates an extraordinary opportunity for nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, China and the independent states of the former Soviet Union to do a wonderful thing and be richly rewarded for it… I am deeply moved when I think of the grief that is being endured by so many Americans, the Americans who are living with the uncertainty of having family members who were missing in action or prisoners… I feel very strongly that the bill is worthwhile even if it only brings one solder home to his family after all of these years.”

Although there is still debate over just how many are still unaccounted for, as far as the gringa’s concerned, a human being is a human being, not a number. The gringa stands with Representative Sheila Jackson-Lee, if even one, single, solitary soldier is still unaccounted for, he matters. Whether alive or dead, he belongs in his homeland.

The folks at the POW Network, www.pownetwork.org, will never forget. They maintain a database regarding all American POW’s and MIA’s during the Vietnam and Korean War eras. The ones who returned alive or whose remains were returned to the United States are updated. Disputed identity claims are noted. But still, considering the ones who have returned or been identified, the list of the ones who remain lost to us is daunting.

As late as January, 2015, remains were still being identified. Some claims of servicemen who are considered killed in action are disputed because their remains were never actually found. The determination was found because the remains of the rest of the crew were discovered and identified. There are also those that were lost at sea. Some POWs and MIAs are even civilians. Some POWs that are considered deceased have only been identified by photographs which has also caused some disagreement over whether family members actually believe it to be their loved one.

As the gringa explored the website, clicked on random names and discovered the information connected with that name, these names came alive for me. I cannot write about “never forgetting” and yet not mention their names. The names are too numerous to list in one blog post. Even by selecting only the ones who are still unaccounted for, the gringa is still left with an enormous task too big for one post. I don’t know at this time how many posts it will take, but consecutive posts will continue the list of names until I reach the very last name on the list. To the gringa, this seems the only respectful thing to do.

As the dear reader explores the list, if you click on an item, whether name, date, military branch or side notes, it is a link that will take you directly to a data page for that particular POW. The gringa thanks you in advance for your patience as I continue to list these names for the next week or so, maybe longer, however long it takes.

Incident          Name                                             Branch        Notes

07-Mar-73     ACKLEY JAMES W.                          CIV

22-Aug-68     ACOSTA-ROSARIO HUMBERTO   ARMY

08-Nov-67     ADAMS JOHN R.                               ARMY

17-Jun-66      ADAMS OLEY N.                              USAF

31-Oct-65      ADAMS SAMUEL                             USAF    On PRG Died in Capitivy 

18-Oct-66      ADAMS STEVEN H.                         USAF

02-Feb-68     ADKINS CHARLES L.                      ARMY

12-Mar-67    ADRIAN JOSEPH D.                         USAF

01-Nov-69    ADVENTIO RUDOLPHO A.              USN

12-May-67   AGOSTO SANTOS JOSE                 USMC

31-May-66   ALBERTSON BOBBY J.                  USAF

13-Dec-68    ALBRIGHT JOHN S. II                    USAF    (Photo)

29-Jun-70     ALDERN DONALD D.                    USN

04-Nov-69   ALFORD TERRY L.                        ARMY   Remains of crew recovered

11-Dec-66   ALFRED GERALD O. JR.               USAF     (Photo)

04-Mar-71   ALGAARD HAROLD L.                  ARMY

24-Aug-67   ALLARD RICHARD M.                   ARMY

26-Mar-70   ALLEN HENRY L.                           USAF

26-Mar-68   ALLGOOD FRANKIE E.                  USMC

12-Aug-66   ALLINSON DAVID J.                      USAF

07-Jun-70   ALLOWAY CLYDE DOUGLAS       USAF

01-Feb-66   ALM RICHARD A.                           USMC

12-Jul-67    ALMENDARIZ SAMUEL                ARMY

08-Oct-69   ALTIZER ALBERT H.                      ARMY

23-Nov-71   ALTUS ROBERT W.                       USAF

27-Feb-67    ALWAN HAROLD J.                      USMC

28-Jan-70    ANDERSON GREGORY L.             USAF

06-Oct-62   ANDERSON THOMAS EDWARD    USMC

26-Apr-66  ANDERSON WARREN L.                 USAF

04-Mar-66  ANDREWS STUART M                    USAF   Buried without remains in 1978. Military ID found 2006.

12-Dec-63 ANGELL MARSHALL J.                   ARMY

18-Oct-66  ANGSTADT RALPH HAROLD         USAF

11-Sep-67  ANSPACH ROBERT A.                    ARMY

24-Jul-71   ANTUNANO GREGORY A.               ARMY

08-Jun-67  APODACA VICTOR J.                      USAF  (Photo) I.D. DISPUTED 06/2001

16-Oct-67   APPELHANS RICHARD D.               USAF

17-Mar-69   ARMISTEAD STEVEN R.                  USMC

18-Jun-65   ARMOND ROBERT L.                      USAF

06-Oct-67   ARMSTRONG FRANK A. III            USAF

09-Nov-67   ARMSTRONG JOHN W.                   USAF

18-Nov-66   ARNOLD WILLIAM T.                       USN

06-APR-70   ARPIN CLAUDE                                CIV     Not on Official DIA Lists

29-Aug-68    ASHALL ALAN F.                            USN

19-Jan-67     ASHBY DONALD R. SR.                  USN

12-May-67    ASHLOCK CARLOS                         USMC

05-Feb-66    ASMUSSEN GLENN EDWARD         USN

18-Jul-71     ASTON JAY S.                                   ARMY

02-Dec-65    AUSTIN CARL BENJAMIN                USN

26-Apr-67    AUSTIN CHARLES D.                        USAF

21-Apr-66    AUSTIN ELLIS E.                               USN

19-Mar-67    AUSTIN JOSEPH C.                          USAF

29-Jul-68     AUXIER JERRY E.                             ARMY

03-May-68   AVERY ROBERT DOUGLAS           USMC

07-Jul-67     AVOLESE PAUL A.                           USAF

18-Jul-65     AVORE MALCOLM A.                      USN

19-Mar-70    AYERS DARRELL EUGENE           USMC

16-Apr-70    AYERS RICHARD L.                         USAF

Photo credit:  http://blog.daum.net/