Incredible Incas, Chpt 1, Pt 1


We follow author Loren McIntyre on his fascinating journey through the history, culture and archeology of Peru’s Incan Empire. In the first part of chapter 1 he talks about all that gold!

 

Let’s discover Peru’s Incan Empire together!

Image Credit:  PBS

Need A Hand?


Did you have any trick-or-treaters show up at your door this past weekend dressed as a skeleton? Chances are their costume wasn’t nearly as time-consuming to make as the skeletal hand created by artist Amy Karle. Talk about taking impressionist art to another level! Karle is just as much a scientist as she is a visual artist. She’s growing a fully-human lady’s hand in a laboratory jar for all our prying, curious eyes to see.

Much like Leonardo da Vinci and other masters of fine art who have gone before her, Karle is inspired by the symmetry of the human body. Her natural curiosity also brings her back to the human body not just as a muse but a medium. Growing a human body within her own during pregnancy was the most exquisite form of artistic expression she had ever experienced. Yet the work of creating another human was performed autonomously. She found that fascinating. Hence the inspiration to grow a human hand as a work of art.

First she scanned the bones of a female hand and created a 3D digital model. Using a medical computer aided detection (CAD) program she built a biodegradable scaffolding system to support the human stem cells until they grew to be self-supporting. Within two years Karle expects the scaffold to biologically degrade and disintegrate while the stem cells grow into tissue and mineralized bone.

The coolest thing about this intriguing project (and probably the coolest thing about Karle) is that the steps of how to do it yourself have been shared. Karle is not the type of artist or scientist to guard her secrets jealously. She wants everyone to have a chance to join the fun if they want to. Whether your perspective is art or scientific research, the gringa thinks that surely there is a dear reader out there who would love to give it a try. Just visit Karle’s post on Instructables.

Now, the gringa thinks this all sounds interesting but is there more to growing a skeletal hand than art or “just because”? Karle believes it will contribute to research and development of cell cultures that can be used in bone grafts, implants or transplants. That’s what the gringa’s talking about. Stuff that’s not just cool but also helps to make the world a better place.

And the gringa could always use another hand at getting things done. Which leads to the gringa’s next question. Is there a possible future with busy overachievers,or parents with half a dozen kids or more, growing and transplanting an extra hand or two to help them out in life? Could we transform humanity into a bi-pedal species that has, not two hands, but three, or four, or even more? Hmph. Stranger things have happened!

Yahoo News – Science

www.amykarle.com

www.popsci.com

Image Credit:  Instructables

 

 

 

Read With The Gringa “The Queen of Mean”, Chapt. 13, Part 1


We continue together reading “The Meanest Doll In The World” by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin. Where is Mean Mimi hiding? What is she up to?

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source: fanpop.com

Read With The Gringa “Who’s Sorry Now”, Chapt. 12’s Conclusion


We finish another chapter together from “The Meanest Doll In The World” by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin. Just how much trouble could Mean Mimi cause for Annabelle’s family?

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source:  3.bp.blogspot.com

Read With The Gringa “Who’s Sorry Now?”, Chapt. 13, Part 1


Read with gringa as we begin a new chapter of “The Meanest Doll In The World” by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin. How did Mean Mimi get to Kate’s house?

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source: boingboing.net

Read With The Gringa “The Story of the King’s Lettuce” Chapt. 15’s Conclusion


We finish the chapter together as we continue “Watership Down” by Richard Adams. El-ahrairah proves what a clever rabbit he is.

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source: www.gapphotos.com

 

Read With The Gringa “The Story of the King’s Lettuce”, Chapt. 15, Part 1


Read along with the gringa as we continue “Watership Down” by Richard Adams. El-ahrairah negotiates with Prince Rainbow a way for all rabbits to be free again.

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source;  cx.aos.ask.com

Read With The Gringa “The Return” Chapt. 11’s Conclusion


We continue the story of “The Meanest Doll In The World” written by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin. Annabelle and Tiffany make it home only to discover a crazy surprise!

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source:  tse3.mm.bing.net

Read With The Gringa “The Return”, Chapt. 11, Part 1


We read together “The Meanest Doll In The World” by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin. Annabelle and Tiffany climb back into BJ’s backpack and hope for the best, a return to the school and then home.

 

Read with the gringa here on WordPress or on Facebook!

Image Source: ak0.pinimg.com

Sun Worship


Earlier this month celestial lovers throughout south and central Africa got to enjoy a spectacular solar eclipse that produced a ring of fire as the Moon transversed across the pathway of the Sun. The peculiar occasions when the Earth, Moon and Sun all line up together doesn’t happen too often. Such a rare event has historically been linked with all sorts of predictions and paranormal expectations.

The funniest recording of a solar eclipse is, perhaps, also the earliest record. Occuring in October of the 2137 B.C., two royal astronomers, Ho and Hi, offended the fourth Emperor of China’s Hsia Dynasty,  Chung-K’ang. The eclipse was an unexpected event. The poor astronomers were unprepared to perform the customary rituals that should have taken place. The pair of official stargazers were drunk and failed to launch the traditional arrows and beat out the right rhythm on the gongs and drums so that the Sun could be delivered from the mythical beast that was attempting to devour it.

Convinced that chaos would soon consume the empire, the astronomers were summarily executed as an appeasement sacrifice for their drunken dereliction of duty.  A public record of their death was translated in 1839 by scholars to reveal an amusing verse indicating that, although brutal in enforcing their expectations, the ancient Chinese did have a sense of humor:

“Here lie the bodies of Ho and Hi,

Whose fate though sad was visible –

Being hanged because they could not spy

Th’ eclipse which was invisible.”

In November of the year 569 an eclipse was recorded before the birth of the Prophet Mohammad in 570. There are many religious historians who link this eclipse as the moment of Mohammad’s conception. Interestingly enough Mohammed’s son Ibrahim died at the age of two-years-old during the occurrence of a solar eclipse. Mohammed wrote of this event as a sign sent from his God, Allah, of personal condolences. Muslims today still consider eclipses significant religious events. When the recent eclipse occurred mosques throughout Africa had special calls to prayer for safety and deliverance from harm.

Perhaps the most significant solar eclipse in modern history is the one of May, 1919. Commonly called “Einstein’s Eclipse”, it is considered to be the solar eclipse that changed the universe. For more than 200 years scientists had accepted Isaac Newton’s principle that the space of the Universe was as inflexible as mathematical principles.  Einstein set out to challenge this longheld belief. Einstein believed gravity was curved and flexible, affected by the mass of planetary bodies. He proposed that warping of space allowed planets to remain in their orbital paths, gravity distorted by the mass of a celestial body, the greater the mass, the stronger the force, which would result in more bending of light. This was to become known as Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.

When the 1919 eclipse occurred, British astrophysicist Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington led the charge for an experiment to take advantage of the expected eclipse. Eddington traveled to Principe which is in the Gulf of Guinea off of Africa’s western coastline. A horrible thunderstorm threatened to ruin Eddington’s chances but, fortunately, by afternoon the skies had cleared. Eddington’s celestial photographs and measurements were compared with photos and measurements recorded by Andrew  Crommelin at the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. The findings were announced by Britain’s Royal Society’s Astronomer Royal Sir Frank Watson Dyson. It was announced in London on November 6, 1919 that Newton’s theory had been disproven by Einstein’s new Theory of Relativity.

To make sure that you are ready for the next opportunity to view a solar eclipse, log on to www.timeanddate.com and keep a watch on the countdown clock for eclipses listed under their Sun & Moon tab. It seems we are only about 5 months away from the next big event.  There is a handy search window everyone can use to see if their city or country is going to be in the most fortunate position of being able to see the eclipse.

To view a solar eclipse it is important to wear protective eyewear. A homemade viewbox can also be created called a pinhole camera. All you need is a box with a small hole on one side for light to pass through and project an inverted image of the eclipse on the opposite side.  Below is a video with an example of how to make and use a homemade pinhole camera. One tip: The bigger the box the better the view.

 

 

Sources:

eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov

www.timeanddate.com

Image Credit: cherokeebillie.files.wordpress.com