A Summary of Sumerians


So what does mankind really know about the ancient civilization of Sumeria? Around 4000 B.C. it was located in a geographical region known as Mesopotamia covering the area we know today as Iraq and Kuwait. The Sumerians called themselves the “black headed people” and they had a written language, cuneiform. They didn’t call their country anything other than “the land” but the people around them called their country Shinar or Sumer. The language they spoke is called Akkadian and means “land of the civilized kings”. It seems Sumeria had a reputation as having some very sophisticated leadership. Who were these kings and what made them so civilized compared to the nations around them?

Eridu is the first Sumerian city to be ruled by a king according to Sumerian religious mythology. Uruk is the oldest city to be established by historians and is also the oldest city in the world that is known to mankind. The “black headed people” who settled here are believed to be the Ubaid people who had evolved from a hunter-gatherer society into an agricultural society. Archaeologists have found remnants of tools and artifacts leading them to this conclusion.

The first record of a king is one named Etana of Kish. He is attributed with creating stability. He is featured in ancient mythology as ascending to heaven on an eagle. Utu-Hegal is next in line and created a document called the “King List”, basically a summary of Sumerian Kings. King Utu-Hegal felt it was an important responsibility to document human accomplishments because they were accountable to the gods who had created them. The manuscript contains names and kingdoms spanning hundreds of thousands of years. An English translation can be read here. Copies of the list have been found by archaeologists in numerous regions remote from Sumeria and recorded in different languages.

One of the reasons their kings may have had such acclaim as founders of civilization is that one of their cities was home to more than 80,000 people. The city rose out of the desert floor, constructed as a massive ziggurat with civilians living in a tiered, pyramid like structure. There were irrigation canals and a sophisticated plumbing network that delivered a water supply from the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. At the time, it would have been the largest city in the world.

Amongst all of those notable kings there was a single woman. With humble beginnings as a tavern-keeper, she rose to monarch status. The King List credits her with firmly establishing the foundations of Kish and creating a dynastic legacy that lasted a century.

More recently, Sumeria’s King List has made the news with some historians speculating on the longevity of the kings. Well, the gringa should say eight kings in particular. They believe the manuscripts and tablets reveal a tale of eight kings who ruled for more than 240,000 years, only meeting their end in what is popularly known as the Great Flood. Archaeology does establish a devastating deluge which is recounted in the mythology of many religions. Historians wonder if these kings were even human, since the King List records that their “kingship was lowered from heaven”.

If they survived for hundreds of thousands of years, only dying because of the catastrophic flood, could they have been considered immortal? Or, were they just long-lived space aliens? Were some of their descendants the result of inter-marriage with shorter lived humans, producing children with long life-spans that inspired tales of characters like Methuselah? You know, the descendant of Adam and Eve who was Noah’s grandfather and lived almost one thousand years? Was Methuselah a space alien? Were all the pre-flood people space aliens or alien/human hybrids? Was the flood’s purpose, then, not to kill all of mankind but only to purge the space alien element?

That would explain the seeming contradiction of how life survived a catastrophe created by a god for the purpose of destroying mankind. It was actually only supposed to destroy the aliens posing as men. I mean, think about it. If these aliens established their kingdoms in desert locales, chances are it’s because they didn’t like water. Maybe the waters of the sea, saltwater, was deadly to them. Maybe a catastrophic flood that would mingle the water of the Earth’s oceans with the freshwater these aliens could tolerate would result in a toxic combination they could not survive. Maybe that’s the nugget of truth behind the legends of water killing witches, like depicted in the “Wizard of Oz“. Like the gringa says, stranger things have happened.

Sources:

www.ancient.eu

reflectionofmind.org

www.history.com

Image Credit: reflectionofmind.org

 

 

 

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gringaofthebarrio

A barrio gringa with a dream of cosmic proportions: writing to satiate my insatiable curiosity, worldwide literacy beginning with our youth, and to be the first barrio gringa to explore outer space!

One thought on “A Summary of Sumerians”

  1. Thanks again for stimulating reading for my home-school. We’re on a world history/geography project that is exploring how connections were made among the different peoples of the world, beginning in ancient times. How’s that for a common core?

    Liked by 1 person

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